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  #41  
Old 01-12-2011, 05:13 PM
stephanie stephanie is offline
 
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Default Re: What America has to offer the world

Quote:
Originally Posted by popcorn_karate View Post
i didn't consider his post an argument, exactly. more a frustrated person waving their hands in the general direction of a perceived problem.
Yeah, frustrated at those damn feminists who ruined our Ozzie and Harriet world that was the foundation of American strength, which is why I responded as I did.

But probably you and I read it differently, due to different baggage and presuppositions.

Quote:
i wasn't trying to point towards any causality, merely pointing out that a choice is still absent in the lives of most people and that is still a problem (the lack of choice). to me, its a pretty big problem because my experience raising children (and having had a mom around growing up because i was lucky enough to be poor before bill clinton was president) leads to me to believe that a stay at home parent is a pretty optimal solution if the economic realities will allow it.
I'll agree with you that there's less choice than would be ideal (although I don't think that's because of women who choose to work, as BornAgainDem's comment seems to me to suggest).

In any event, my own experiences (including having had a mother who worked while my sister and I were growing up) generally predispose me to a different view of the ideal world, I suspect. (I don't feel like getting into this argument now, though.)

In any event, my problem was with the blaming (and the bizarre connection to American military and cultural strength).
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  #42  
Old 01-12-2011, 05:18 PM
cragger cragger is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

The whole market model seems like a poor one for medical care. We know that people don't much resemble the Homo Economicus that the market theologians fantisize about at the best of times in making economic choices, and medical choices are emotionally fraught and may be made under time pressure by people who are sick, in pain, or sleep-deprived as well. It isn't much like thinking about buying a camera, doing research, reading reviews, considering features, comparison shopping, and trying to find an optimal personal value point. Both reason and personal experience inform me pretty clearly that someone lying in the street bleeding doesn't ask for lists of different ambulance companies, pricing data, response times, and service differentiators, or charge lists from area emergency rooms, with all potential procedures and treatments broken out together with info on physicians on call at each location and performance metrics with which to optimize a purchase of services. It just doesn't work that way.
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  #43  
Old 01-12-2011, 05:48 PM
BornAgainDemocrat BornAgainDemocrat is offline
 
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Default Re: What America has to offer the world

Originally Posted by popcorn_karate:

"We have gone from one person being able to support a family while the other raised the children a generation or two ago, to the current situation where both people have to work while other people take care of their children."

Quote:
Originally Posted by stephanie View Post
Oh, for God's sake, you mean you want me to take BornAgainDem's argument seriously?

I think you are focusing on an overly narrow time period and segment of the population in claiming that, but more importantly I'd like some evidence that the reason for the change is working women.
I think there are three factors driving real hourly wages down, which is what we are talking about: mass immigration, free trade with countries like China, and new labor-saving technologies. In the case of the latter, some of the best examples were all the new household appliances that became widespread in the 1950's and 60's: automatic clothes washers and dryers, dishwashers, microwaves, and the like (not to mention wrinkle free fabrics, t.v. dinners, etc). The effect was to make it possible for women to enter the workforce full-time, which many millions did. It increased the supply of labor, which lowered the price, as did (and do) immigration and trade with populous poor countries like China.

In other words, three causes, not one, undermined the American standard of living. All three continue to operate. Real hourly wages will continue to fall for the foreseeable future. It is irresponsible for our elected officials not to realize this and do something about it. A shorter standard workweek, immigration timeout, and tariffs on China would be obvious places to start.
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  #44  
Old 01-12-2011, 06:08 PM
ohreally ohreally is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Just had root canal... (thanks for the kind words). A friend from Germany pointed out it'd been cheaper for me to fly to Berlin and have the operation there. I paid $1,250. She said the same treatment would be about $75 where she lives.

My procedure was as low-tech as it gets: a dentist and her assistant plus an X-ray machine displaying the picture on a Dell monitor. The whole thing took less than one hour.

Anyone who can explain the difference betwen $1,250 and $75 for exactly the same procedure will understand what ails health care in this country.

Last edited by ohreally; 01-12-2011 at 06:11 PM..
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  #45  
Old 01-12-2011, 06:12 PM
BornAgainDemocrat BornAgainDemocrat is offline
 
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Default Re: What America has to offer the world

Quote:
Originally Posted by Florian View Post
Could you please provide evidence for your claim that different population groups are endowed with different sets of abilities and disabilities?
Professional sports are the most obvious example. Admissions rates to colleges are another.

Without really intending to, we are evolving into a racially-stratified class society.

Last edited by BornAgainDemocrat; 01-12-2011 at 06:17 PM..
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  #46  
Old 01-12-2011, 06:39 PM
harkin harkin is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Zeko View Post
Except that there are several reasons that "private" health care in this country is a massive market failure, and the rest of the developed world has some kind of universal health care scheme, much cheaper health care, and at least as good results. I continue to be stunned that so many people think that free market platitudes constitute an effective argument when the track record of our "free market" health care system is so bad relative to more government-centric systems.

The free market only really applies to some cosmetic surgery and any procedure not covered under medical insurance (unless of course you're a teacher for the Buffalo Public Schools, whose employees are covered for cosmetic surgery by their taxpayer-funded insurance.......and their cosmetic surgery bills went from $1 mil in 2004 to $9 mil in 2009 - "the vast majority of those procedures — nine out of 10 of them — were chemical peels, laser hair removal, skin rejuvenation and other skin treatments").


Look at the cost increases over the last 20 years in regards to elective as opposed to necessary surgery and you may be suprised. There's a reason people with insurance don't mind being gouged $18 for a tylenol, because they don't think it comes directly out of their own pockets; it has nothing to do with the free-market.
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  #47  
Old 01-12-2011, 07:30 PM
basman basman is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

...bjkeefe wrote on 01/11/2011 at 07:00 PM
Hear, hear

Very well put, David....

Could you elaborate please?

Itzik Basman
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  #48  
Old 01-12-2011, 08:05 PM
Ocean Ocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by basman View Post
...bjkeefe wrote on 01/11/2011 at 07:00 PM
Hear, hear

Very well put, David....

Could you elaborate please?

Itzik Basman
Did you listen to the dingalink?
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  #49  
Old 01-12-2011, 08:13 PM
bkjazfan bkjazfan is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohreally View Post
Just had root canal... (thanks for the kind words). A friend from Germany pointed out it'd been cheaper for me to fly to Berlin and have the operation there. I paid $1,250. She said the same treatment would be about $75 where she lives.

My procedure was as low-tech as it gets: a dentist and her assistant plus an X-ray machine displaying the picture on a Dell monitor. The whole thing took less than one hour.

Anyone who can explain the difference betwen $1,250 and $75 for exactly the same procedure will understand what ails health care in this country.
David Goldman's article for "Atlantic" last year talked about something similar. MRI's are quite expensive even though the technology is ancient by todays' standards in this fast moving electronic age; nevertheless, everyone charges a high fee.

Also, as pointed out by Harkin many cosmetic surgeries have come down in price due to it's mostly paid out of pocket not covered by private insurance and the government. The free market is supposedly at work here (I'm never sure about that anymore). This is occurring while almost everything else in health care going up.

Frum's knowledge of medical care and it's costs appear as limited as mine.

John
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  #50  
Old 01-12-2011, 10:30 PM
ohreally ohreally is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Health care providers are overpaid. That's because the laws of the free market don't apply to the health industry especially when the supply side is rationed (as it is in the US). Health care is like food: it's non-optional. You cannot choose not to have your appendix removed when it's inflamed. You would sell every possession you own if need be (since the alternative is death). Food, however, is abundant and comes with infinite choices. But if your appendix hurts, you cannot say, well I can't afford to have it removed so I'll get my tonsils out instead. Ergo health care should be regulated.
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  #51  
Old 01-12-2011, 10:42 PM
Ocean Ocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohreally View Post
Health care providers are overpaid.
No, I don't agree with that. Medical education is overpriced, very demanding and is highly competitive. Health care providers are scarce and precious. When you need to get that appendix out, your coronary arteries unclogged, or diabetes monitored, you don't want the underpaid guy to do it. As it is, some medical specialties are underpaid.
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  #52  
Old 01-12-2011, 11:58 PM
TwinSwords TwinSwords is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
Health care providers are scarce and precious.
I agree. :-)
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  #53  
Old 01-13-2011, 12:52 AM
Unit Unit is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
No, I don't agree with that. Medical education is overpriced, very demanding and is highly competitive. Health care providers are scarce and precious. When you need to get that appendix out, your coronary arteries unclogged, or diabetes monitored, you don't want the underpaid guy to do it. As it is, some medical specialties are underpaid.
Medical education is overpriced + several other interventions ---> Healthcare providers are scarce, which ----> Healthcare providers are overpaid.

It's simple theory of supply: if you restrict it, it costs more.
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  #54  
Old 01-13-2011, 02:32 AM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
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Default Devolution

Quote:
Originally Posted by harkin View Post
The free market only really applies to some cosmetic surgery and any procedure not covered under medical insurance (unless of course you're a teacher for the Buffalo Public Schools, whose employees are covered for cosmetic surgery by their taxpayer-funded insurance.......and their cosmetic surgery bills went from $1 mil in 2004 to $9 mil in 2009 - "the vast majority of those procedures — nine out of 10 of them — were chemical peels, laser hair removal, skin rejuvenation and other skin treatments").
This almost seemed like a rare post where something of actual substance was going to be said. But alas, an inane triviality that has been burning this commenter up since he read about it on Gateway Pundit or somewhere quickly became the point(?).

Also, Bill Clinton once paid $200 for a haircut!!!1! And Al Gore has a big house!!!1! And what about that elitist Obama, asking about mustard, huh? HUH???1?

Isn't Buffalo like 2000 miles from where you live, harkin?
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Last edited by bjkeefe; 01-13-2011 at 04:42 AM..
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  #55  
Old 01-13-2011, 07:03 AM
The_Waco_Kid The_Waco_Kid is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Mickey kind of contradicts himself. Early on, he identifies AARP as an interest group that has captured the Democratic Party and is forcing us to spend too much money on Social Security, which only benefits seniors. Later he offers huge support for Medicare, but this is still "interest group spending" by his definition. Maybe he's willing to make an exception for Medicare, but it weakens his case and he's being sort of inconsistent.
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  #56  
Old 01-13-2011, 08:54 AM
Ocean Ocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinSwords View Post
I agree. :-)
I admit I should have added a next to the "precious" part. Last night I was in a mellow and humorous mood.
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  #57  
Old 01-13-2011, 08:56 AM
Ocean Ocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unit View Post
Medical education is overpriced + several other interventions ---> Healthcare providers are scarce, which ----> Healthcare providers are overpaid.

It's simple theory of supply: if you restrict it, it costs more.
Generally speaking I agree with the supply theory. But in this case, add the competitive aspect to your equation.
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  #58  
Old 01-13-2011, 10:06 AM
Unit Unit is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
Generally speaking I agree with the supply theory. But in this case, add the competitive aspect to your equation.
Can you elaborate on what you mean by "the competitive aspect"?

As I said there are many ways to restrict supply in the medical profession and one of the most egregious ones, in my view, is how hard it is for foreign doctors to come practice in the US. That's definitely an anti-competitive measure.
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  #59  
Old 01-13-2011, 01:09 PM
ohreally ohreally is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
you don't want the underpaid guy to do it.
The negation of overpaid is not underpaid. German doctors are not underpaid. There is zero evidence that the US surgeon who removes your appendix is better qualified at that job than his German counterpart. He probably went through a more selective process but that extra selection has only negative benefits for society (but positive ones for the surgeon). The production of American doctors is rationed, which is partly why they can get away with being overpaid. So is the delivery of quality care. So only rationing explains the excessive compensation of American doctors.

Again there is no evidence that US doctors are any better than their European counterparts so, quality wise, that extra selection (the premed syndrome) is worthless.
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  #60  
Old 01-13-2011, 06:33 PM
Unit Unit is offline
 
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Default Re: There's nothing more boring than institutional reform.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Zeko View Post
So I would say that we ought to do away with holds and the filibuster in the Senate.
By the way Don, if a practice becomes common then maybe it should be "institutionalized", i.e. should be entered in the rule-book. The filibuster is become more popular in recent years or both sides, it means that it's something desirable for many, so I would be ok with making it standard procedure.
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  #61  
Old 01-13-2011, 07:39 PM
Don Zeko Don Zeko is offline
 
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Default Re: There's nothing more boring than institutional reform.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unit View Post
By the way Don, if a practice becomes common then maybe it should be "institutionalized", i.e. should be entered in the rule-book. The filibuster is become more popular in recent years or both sides, it means that it's something desirable for many, so I would be ok with making it standard procedure.
The filibuster is standard procedure; it's been used on practically every vote of any consequence. Why its popularity should validate it as a good thing for American government is beyond me. It's as if there wasn't actually a rule against defensive linemen using tazers in professional football. Once someone realized that you could taze the offensive line on every play, of course any team that wanted to win would equip their defense with tazers. But that wouldn't make it a good rule. The horrible results of such a rule, namely lots of 0-0 ties and brain-damaged offensive players, would prove that the rule was stupid and ought to be changed.
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  #62  
Old 01-13-2011, 08:14 PM
Ocean Ocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohreally View Post
The negation of overpaid is not underpaid. German doctors are not underpaid. There is zero evidence that the US surgeon who removes your appendix is better qualified at that job than his German counterpart. He probably went through a more selective process but that extra selection has only negative benefits for society (but positive ones for the surgeon). The production of American doctors is rationed, which is partly why they can get away with being overpaid. So is the delivery of quality care. So only rationing explains the excessive compensation of American doctors.

Again there is no evidence that US doctors are any better than their European counterparts so, quality wise, that extra selection (the premed syndrome) is worthless.
I agree with you. I don't think there's any reason to think that physicians here are better than European counterparts.

The text you quoted in my previous comment has to do with physicians in the US. It isn't uncommon that physicians that offer inexpensive services tend to be less qualified. However, I make exception for those physicians that offer more inexpensive services because they are serving an impoverished population, and they do a lot of pro bono work. Also I make exception of physicians who work for large health care systems that offer affordable services or charity care for low income under-served population.
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  #63  
Old 01-13-2011, 08:24 PM
TwinSwords TwinSwords is offline
 
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Default Re: There's nothing more boring than institutional reform.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Zeko View Post
The filibuster is standard procedure; it's been used on practically every vote of any consequence. Why its popularity should validate it as a good thing for American government is beyond me. It's as if there wasn't actually a rule against defensive linemen using tazers in professional football. Once someone realized that you could taze the offensive line on every play, of course any team that wanted to win would equip their defense with tazers. But that wouldn't make it a good rule. The horrible results of such a rule, namely lots of 0-0 ties and brain-damaged offensive players, would prove that the rule was stupid and ought to be changed.
Post of the year.
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  #64  
Old 01-13-2011, 08:31 PM
Ocean Ocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unit View Post
Can you elaborate on what you mean by "the competitive aspect"?
I meant competitive in the sense that it's difficult to get in medical school and there's a lot of competition among students.

Quote:
As I said there are many ways to restrict supply in the medical profession and one of the most egregious ones, in my view, is how hard it is for foreign doctors to come practice in the US. That's definitely an anti-competitive measure.
Yes, the number of American medical graduates is limited. Foreign graduates have to take difficult exams that also limit the number that are able to practice in the US. As I said, I agree that supply and demand influence physicians' income. But also, medical education is so expensive and takes so many years, that if the income was significantly lower, it may not attract the same quality of students that you have now.
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  #65  
Old 01-13-2011, 08:37 PM
chiwhisoxx chiwhisoxx is offline
 
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Default Re: There's nothing more boring than institutional reform.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unit View Post
By the way Don, if a practice becomes common then maybe it should be "institutionalized", i.e. should be entered in the rule-book. The filibuster is become more popular in recent years or both sides, it means that it's something desirable for many, so I would be ok with making it standard procedure.
Slavery was common, how did institutionalizing that work out?
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  #66  
Old 01-13-2011, 09:09 PM
Unit Unit is offline
 
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Default Re: There's nothing more boring than institutional reform.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Zeko View Post
The filibuster is standard procedure; it's been used on practically every vote of any consequence. Why its popularity should validate it as a good thing for American government is beyond me. It's as if there wasn't actually a rule against defensive linemen using tazers in professional football. Once someone realized that you could taze the offensive line on every play, of course any team that wanted to win would equip their defense with tazers. But that wouldn't make it a good rule. The horrible results of such a rule, namely lots of 0-0 ties and brain-damaged offensive players, would prove that the rule was stupid and ought to be changed.
I doubt you would find people wanting to play the tazer version of football that you're advocating and the fact that it doesn't exist is proof enough of the absurdity of your example. On the other hand, the filibuster is quite welcome by either side whenever it serves their goals, so why should the goals of the people harmed by the filibuster be any more relevant than those who would be advantaged from its removal? It's like saying that the 3-point line in basketball is unfair to the defense because the offense can succeed in scoring 3 instead of 2 points.
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  #67  
Old 01-13-2011, 09:11 PM
Unit Unit is offline
 
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Default Re: There's nothing more boring than institutional reform.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chiwhisoxx View Post
Slavery was common, how did institutionalizing that work out?
Do you seriously want to equate the filibuster to slavery?
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  #68  
Old 01-13-2011, 09:11 PM
Unit Unit is offline
 
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Default Re: There's nothing more boring than institutional reform.

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Originally Posted by TwinSwords View Post
Post of the year.
The year is quite young.
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  #69  
Old 01-13-2011, 09:18 PM
Unit Unit is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
I meant competitive in the sense that it's difficult to get in medical school and there's a lot of competition among students.



Yes, the number of American medical graduates is limited. Foreign graduates have to take difficult exams that also limit the number that are able to practice in the US. As I said, I agree that supply and demand influence physicians' income. But also, medical education is so expensive and takes so many years, that if the income was significantly lower, it may not attract the same quality of students that you have now.
Restrictions on the supply cut both ways though. On one hand, as you say, it makes for harder training (and I'm not going to question here whether theoretical training in school is better than practical training on the job etc....let's leave that argument for another day). But on the other hand, since the smaller number that do become physicians have a much more protected job (protected from competition of potential newcomers, this is what it means to have a restricted supply) that means that you have a reduced incentive to perform well or to keep up to date. So the "quality" argument is not that strong in my opinion.
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  #70  
Old 01-13-2011, 09:36 PM
chiwhisoxx chiwhisoxx is offline
 
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Default Re: There's nothing more boring than institutional reform.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unit View Post
Do you seriously want to equate the filibuster to slavery?
You're missing the point; do you seriously want to argue that we should institutionalize anything that's common?
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  #71  
Old 01-13-2011, 09:47 PM
Ocean Ocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unit View Post
Restrictions on the supply cut both ways though. On one hand, as you say, it makes for harder training (and I'm not going to question here whether theoretical training in school is better than practical training on the job etc....let's leave that argument for another day). But on the other hand, since the smaller number that do become physicians have a much more protected job (protected from competition of potential newcomers, this is what it means to have a restricted supply) that means that you have a reduced incentive to perform well or to keep up to date. So the "quality" argument is not that strong in my opinion.
The quality argument isn't derived from the limited supply, I agree.

In the case of physicians the quality is derived from professional licensing requirements, and as everything else in "free markets" but pressures from consumers, malpractice suits, in addition to ethical standards and personal responsibility from people that have been through years of higher education.

Physicians have theoretical and practical training. For those who are not familiar, it's 4 years of college, 4 years of medical school, and 4-8 years of residency training depending on the specialty, in order to get a license. Surgical specialties tend to be the longest. Residency training is practical training on the job. It's a very long time, a lot of education, and sometimes not enough since the body of knowledge in medicine continues to grow at accelerated pace.
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  #72  
Old 01-14-2011, 02:36 AM
Unit Unit is offline
 
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Default Re: There's nothing more boring than institutional reform.

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Originally Posted by chiwhisoxx View Post
You're missing the point; do you seriously want to argue that we should institutionalize anything that's common?
You're missing the point, I never said we should institutionalize anything that's common. I said that when certain practices become common for both sides of a repeated 2-person game, you might consider consolidating the customs into the rule-book. It's an option that should be considered and not dismissed out of hand. You don't "create new traditions", you acknowledge them once they develop.
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  #73  
Old 01-14-2011, 11:01 AM
eeeeeeeli eeeeeeeli is offline
 
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Default Re: What America has to offer the world

Quote:
Originally Posted by BornAgainDemocrat View Post
Dear BJ:

I wish this observation could be chalked up to prejudice on my part. But unfortunately it is based on all the evidence so far, to which our elites (and conventional liberals as yourself) are determined to turn a blind eye.

Third and fourth generation Latino immigrants lag far behind their Asian and European counterparts by all measures of educational and economic achievement. This not just about the new arrivals who don't speak English well. I wish it were not the case, but, as an early Israeli settler once remarked about new immigrants from Morocco, facts are facts.
Wow. So prejudice = racism without evidence. What does racism backed up by evidence equal? I think the technical term is actually "racialism".

This is probably a waste of time, but BAD, I'd just point out that you really should spend more time looking into early childhood development, with regard to socioeconomic status (education/income/occupation/family/neighborhood/etc.), ethnicity and success.

I'll also note that again, these sorts of views are almost always aligned with the social and economic right. In many ways the politics and racial views are a feedback loop. But I think a strong case can be made that the logic of a conservative view of economics and human nature actually leads to racist ideas. And this isn't simply ad hominem. I can explain the exact logic of this hypothesis.
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  #74  
Old 01-14-2011, 06:05 PM
basman basman is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
Did you listen to the dingalink?
Yeah: What's the big geshrey?

It's a sincere question.

What am I missing.

Itzik Basman, who barely knows what a dingalink is.
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  #75  
Old 01-14-2011, 07:57 PM
Ocean Ocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Take Three (Mickey Kaus & David Frum)

Quote:
Originally Posted by basman View Post
Yeah: What's the big geshrey?

It's a sincere question.

What am I missing.

Itzik Basman, who barely knows what a dingalink is.
Brendan should answer the question, but I think he just identified with what David said in a general way.
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  #76  
Old 01-15-2011, 02:49 PM
thouartgob thouartgob is offline
 
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Default What does David Frum and when did he know it ??

Quote:
Originally Posted by basman View Post
Yeah: What's the big geshrey?

It's a sincere question.

What am I missing.

Itzik Basman, who barely knows what a dingalink is.
Here is a dingalink where Mr Frum asks a question about the where abouts of a "fictional" walmart type healthcare institution

Here is a Link answering the question about a not so fictional service that may be coming to a sams club near you.

The dingalink is a link that, when clicked on opens one's browser to a specific time in the diavlog so that people can easily trade useful bits of the back and forth between the diavloggers.

More in depth is that a dingalink is a bookmark ( url address or the http://www...) that has in it the beginning time of a clip and it's end time. When the bloggingheads website gets a request from your web browser it checks to see if there some extra data attached to the usual link for a diavlog (i.e. start time and end time at the end )

There are some tools that will on the page that will allow to create one ( the 2 black triangles with the little x in the middle , left one sets start time right one end time as a fer instance ) Click the SHARE button to reveal a menu that allow you to create a dingalink url or a chunk of HTML code to put on to a blog or whathaveyou.

Now back to frum and his prescient question. Prescient ?? or a Plug for this new initiative ??? Does he have a back end deal here or what :-)
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  #77  
Old 01-15-2011, 03:48 PM
basman basman is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 648
Default Re: What does David Frum and when did he know it ??

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Originally Posted by thouartgob View Post
Here is a dingalink where Mr Frum asks a question about the where abouts of a "fictional" walmart type healthcare institution

Here is a Link answering the question about a not so fictional service that may be coming to a sams club near you.

The dingalink is a link that, when clicked on opens one's browser to a specific time in the diavlog so that people can easily trade useful bits of the back and forth between the diavloggers.

More in depth is that a dingalink is a bookmark ( url address or the http://www...) that has in it the beginning time of a clip and it's end time. When the bloggingheads website gets a request from your web browser it checks to see if there some extra data attached to the usual link for a diavlog (i.e. start time and end time at the end )

There are some tools that will on the page that will allow to create one ( the 2 black triangles with the little x in the middle , left one sets start time right one end time as a fer instance ) Click the SHARE button to reveal a menu that allow you to create a dingalink url or a chunk of HTML code to put on to a blog or whathaveyou.

Now back to frum and his prescient question. Prescient ?? or a Plug for this new initiative ??? Does he have a back end deal here or what :-)
Thanks thouart, but you lost me at "More in depth..."

I'll check out the Frum thing more closely and give it a bit of thought at a better moment.

Itzik Basman, lovable luddite
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  #78  
Old 01-16-2011, 01:17 PM
thouartgob thouartgob is offline
 
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Posts: 765
Talking Re: What does David Frum and when did he know it ??

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Originally Posted by basman View Post
you lost me at "More in depth..."
I hear that often enough to now wonder if maybe it's ME !! :-)
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  #79  
Old 01-16-2011, 06:54 PM
graz graz is offline
 
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Posts: 3,162
Default Any Excuse For Mickey Bashing Is Allowed.

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Originally Posted by graz View Post
Quote:
This is Mickey Kaus doing his elaborate dance, calling himself a Democrat and liberal while he mouths every anti-leftist screed possible, calling unions the cause of all of our problems while unions are a dessicated, impotent shell of what they once were.
That is an excerpt from a piece that touches in part on the subject of the so-called leftwing bias @bhtv.

Source: Freddie deBoer
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  #80  
Old 01-16-2011, 07:32 PM
TwinSwords TwinSwords is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Heartland Conservative
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Default Re: Any Excuse For Mickey Bashing Is Allowed.

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Originally Posted by graz View Post
That is an excerpt from a piece that touches in part on the subject of the so-called leftwing bias @bhtv.

Source: Freddie deBoer
Very interesting post; thanks for passing it along. The comments thread looks interesting, too. For the record, I think Wilkinson is wrong when he says the American public is right-wing. Polls have for decades shown that there is broad public support for a mixed economy, welfare state, and liberal values generally.

See here, here, here, here, and here.

The lie that the public is right of center has been repeated so long that most people have either come to accept it, or have given up disputing it.
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