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  #1  
Old 01-07-2010, 09:20 PM
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Default Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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  #2  
Old 01-07-2010, 11:14 PM
brucds brucds is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

Not to pick nits but Arnold Schwarznegger didn't come from behind the Iron Curtain. He's Austrian.

Oh yeah...and please spare us any Bob Wright diavlogs about Bob Dylan.
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  #3  
Old 01-07-2010, 11:16 PM
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by brucds View Post
Not to pick nits but Arnold Schwarznegger didn't come from behind the Iron Curtain. He's Austrian.

Oh yeah...and please spare us any Bob Wright diavlogs about Bob Dylan.
What's the scoop with that?
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  #4  
Old 01-08-2010, 09:43 AM
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by brucds View Post
Not to pick nits but Arnold Schwarznegger didn't come from behind the Iron Curtain. He's Austrian.

Oh yeah...and please spare us any Bob Wright diavlogs about Bob Dylan.
Well, you know, aficionados of Elvis, may be excused for being a bit confused about geography, politics, things like that.
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  #5  
Old 01-08-2010, 12:09 AM
rcocean rcocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

Interesting diavlog for the most part. Elvis could be discussed in relationship to many things - too bad we got stuck with the tired dull "racism" topic.

BTW, I'd love to see a Diavlog on why intelligent adults become dedicated - even obsessive - fans of certain singers. I get the impression these people don't care what they sing, they just want to hear Dylan, Streisand, The boss, etc.

And they're willing to spend hundreds/thousands of dollars to hear them in person. Seems crazy to me, so I'm curious what Bob's Darwinian evolution explanation is.
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  #6  
Old 01-08-2010, 04:20 AM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by rcocean View Post
... too bad we got stuck with the tired dull "racism" topic.
Yes. That part was torturous.
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  #7  
Old 01-08-2010, 12:10 AM
cognitive madisonian cognitive madisonian is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

I don't think Elvis was a great artist. He was a great entertainer. He never wrote a song in his life, and his voice was nice but not anything truly special. He was eclipsed by people with far more talent.
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  #8  
Old 01-08-2010, 11:47 AM
badhatharry badhatharry is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by cognitive madisonian View Post
I don't think Elvis was a great artist. He was a great entertainer. He never wrote a song in his life, and his voice was nice but not anything truly special. He was eclipsed by people with far more talent.
There are so many people who are called great artists that the appellation has become meaningless. But I disagree about his voice. For the time and given that he had no training, it was pretty great.
I just watched Cadillac Records and although I already knew this, it brought out how black blues was co-opted by the likes of Rolling Stones, Elvis and The Beach Boys. I guess that's one of the results of becoming mainstream.
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  #9  
Old 01-08-2010, 12:05 PM
AemJeff AemJeff is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by badhatharry View Post
There are so many people who are called great artists that the appellation has become meaningless. But I disagree about his voice. For the time and given that he had no training, it was pretty great.
I just watched Cadillac Records and although I already knew this, it brought out how black blues was co-opted by the likes of Rolling Stones, Elvis and The Beach Boys. I guess that's one of the results of becoming mainstream.
One measure of someone's artistry is the downstream influence they have on their successors. By that measure, Elvis is unambiguously of the first rank.
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  #10  
Old 01-08-2010, 12:29 PM
badhatharry badhatharry is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by AemJeff View Post
One measure of someone's artistry is the downstream influence they have on their successors. By that measure, Elvis is unambiguously of the first rank.
So I suppose by the number of Elvis impersonators in Las Vegas and in Holiday Inns we can assume Elvis is a great artist? :-)
I guess I wonder who was influenced by him other than kids. But not having been a fan, I guess I wouldn't know much about it. It seems to me the influence which came from him originally came from the blues and gospel.

And here I would like to add my vote to a diavlog with Bob investigating Dylan. I have always had love/hate opinions about him. Primarily I think he is arrogant and insincere and has been putting us on since he came on the scene.
On the other hand his wordsmithery and ability to rhyme is impressive, indeed.

Last edited by badhatharry; 01-08-2010 at 12:43 PM.. Reason: one more thing
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  #11  
Old 01-08-2010, 12:42 PM
AemJeff AemJeff is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by badhatharry View Post
So I suppose by the number of Elvis impersonators in Las Vegas we can assume Elvis is a great artist? :-)
I guess I wonder who was influenced by him other than kids. But not having been a fan, I guess I wouldn't know much about it. It seems to me the influence which came from him originally came from the blues and gospel.

And here I would like to add my vote to a diavlog with Bob investigating Dylan. I have always had love/hate opinions about him. Primarily I think he is arrogant and insincere and has been putting us on since he came on the scene.
On the other hand his wordsmithery and ability to rhyme is impressive, indeed.
Think about the Sun Records crew (Roy Orbison and Johnny Cash, e.g.) Buddy Holly, the Beatles, The Stones, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, and Neil Diamond - just off the top of my head. American popular music was transformed by Elvis as a first order effect, and that influence only magnified at the second order. Very few people have anything like his claim to primacy in this arena. And I haven't even mentioned the vast array of non-musical cultural influences stemming from his career.
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  #12  
Old 01-08-2010, 12:55 PM
badhatharry badhatharry is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by AemJeff View Post
Think about the Sun Records crew (Roy Orbison and Johnny Cash, e.g.) Buddy Holly, the Beatles, The Stones, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, and Neil Diamond - just off the top of my head. American popular music was transformed by Elvis as a first order effect, and that influence only magnified at the second order. Very few people have anything like his claim to primacy in this arena. And I haven't even mentioned the vast array of non-musical cultural influences stemming from his career.
Neil Young?

OK, you win, he was a great influence. I was just thinking that Chris Isaak could also be included, not to mention Fonsi.
He also did a lot for the leather jacket industry.
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  #13  
Old 01-08-2010, 12:58 PM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by badhatharry View Post
He also did a lot for the leather jacket industry.
I can think of very few things that disappointed me about the American public more than the time the Post Office did a survey about which Elvis to put on the new stamp, and the leather-jacket Elvis was swamped by the jumpsuit Elvis.
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  #14  
Old 01-08-2010, 01:14 PM
badhatharry badhatharry is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by bjkeefe View Post
I can think of very few things that disappointed me about the American public more than the time ......
I bet upon further consideration you will find this to be an overstatement.
(tentative smiley face, fully expecting an insult in your response, tentative smiley face)
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  #15  
Old 01-08-2010, 01:27 PM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by badhatharry View Post
I bet upon further consideration you will find this to be an overstatement.
When you think about how long it's been since that event, it seems unlikely. I can write off almost anything to "different strokes for different folks," but this seemed like one of those matters of taste where there was an objectively correct answer.

Ah, well. All the cool kids were probably onto email by then, anyway, so they were all, "Stamps? What's dat?" Or, they voted for the fat Elvis out of a sense of irony.

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(tentative smiley face, fully expecting an insult in your response, tentative smiley face)
Ah, no. I can keep a civil tongue at least once in a while.
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  #16  
Old 01-08-2010, 02:13 PM
popcorn_karate popcorn_karate is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by bjkeefe View Post
Or, they voted for the fat Elvis out of a sense of irony.
sounds right. and funny.
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  #17  
Old 01-08-2010, 02:23 PM
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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sounds right. and funny.
I don't think so. I would have voted for young Elvis, but people who truly loved Elvis would maybe have appreciated his troubles and his journey and voted sincerely.
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  #18  
Old 01-08-2010, 03:56 PM
popcorn_karate popcorn_karate is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by look View Post
I don't think so. I would have voted for young Elvis, but people who truly loved Elvis would maybe have appreciated his troubles and his journey and voted sincerely.
yeah, but me and my friends and acquaintances would be inclined to vote for fat elvis for the irony and humor value.

the whole weirdness of graceland and the "elvis lives" rumors, and the ubiquity of elvis impersonators - it all just cries out for mockery - and what better mockery than the reality of Elvis himself.
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  #19  
Old 01-08-2010, 03:41 PM
AemJeff AemJeff is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by badhatharry View Post
Neil Young?

OK, you win, he was a great influence. I was just thinking that Chris Isaak could also be included, not to mention Fonsi.
He also did a lot for the leather jacket industry.
Neil Young, definitely.

http://s0.ilike.com/play#Neil+Young:...9e7ee62dd4c1c1
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  #20  
Old 01-08-2010, 12:53 PM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by badhatharry View Post
So I suppose by the number of Elvis impersonators in Las Vegas and in Holiday Inns we can assume Elvis is a great artist? :-)
Nice.

Quote:
I guess I wonder who was influenced by him other than kids.
I am the furthest thing from an Elvis fan, but Mark's claim that Elvis influenced a generation of musicians in performance style, especially on stage, rang true to me.

Quote:
And here I would like to add my vote to a diavlog with Bob investigating Dylan. I have always had love/hate opinions about him. Primarily I think he is arrogant and insincere and has been putting us on since he came on the scene.
Oh, no, please no. Can't I be allowed to have at least one boyhood hero left up on just a tiny little bit of a pedestal?

Plus, when Bob puts on his cultural critic's hat, it's invariably his worst wardrobe choice. He just never sounds like he knows anything more than the last thing he heard said on the matter. He sounded more than a bit gullible when he talked about his opinion of Dylan being completely changed by watching one documentary. I was reminded of nothing so much as the sort of person who forwards a chain email about Tupperware in the microwave causing cancer, with the added note, YOU HAVE TO READ THIS!!!1!

Okay, so Bobby Zimmerman has his warts and plenty of them. I'll grant that. But of all the people who deserve to be taken down a notch or two, I'd place him about last on the list.
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  #21  
Old 01-08-2010, 06:35 PM
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by bjkeefe View Post

I am the furthest thing from an Elvis fan, ...
I share the feeling...


Quote:
Oh, no, please no. Can't I be allowed to have at least one boyhood hero left up on just a tiny little bit of a pedestal?
...

Okay, so Bobby Zimmerman has his warts and plenty of them. I'll grant that. But of all the people who deserve to be taken down a notch or two, I'd place him about last on the list.
Yeah, I like that Bobby too.
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  #22  
Old 01-08-2010, 07:12 PM
uncle ebeneezer uncle ebeneezer is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

I'm gonna have to jump in to defend the King a bit here (although I HATE that expression.) Elvis may not have written his own songs and his voice is not technically astounding (heck I can sing pretty much anything he could) and his jumpsuit/movies etc. were the paramount of cheesiness. But the WAY in which he sang, using the blues influence in his inflection, was what made him pretty great. I think this often gets overlooked. When he sings something like "Treat me like a fool" you can almost hear the heartache through the waves of the phonograph. It was probably because he had so many personal issues of his own, but it worked like a charm. I think he is often over-rated by his die-hard fans, but under-rated by his haters. How's that for picking the squishy middle? ;-)
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  #23  
Old 01-08-2010, 07:37 PM
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by uncle ebeneezer View Post
I'm gonna have to jump in to defend the King a bit here (although I HATE that expression.) Elvis may not have written his own songs and his voice is not technically astounding (heck I can sing pretty much anything he could) and his jumpsuit/movies etc. were the paramount of cheesiness. But the WAY in which he sang, using the blues influence in his inflection, was what made him pretty great. I think this often gets overlooked. When he sings something like "Treat me like a fool" you can almost hear the heartache through the waves of the phonograph. It was probably because he had so many personal issues of his own, but it worked like a charm. I think he is often over-rated by his die-hard fans, but under-rated by his haters. How's that for picking the squishy middle? ;-)
You can examine art forms analytically if you want. But there is a dimension to art that is essentially emotional and doesn't respond to the kind of argument you make. There is music that reaches you and takes you to different levels and music that doesn't. Elvis doesn't do it for me... but I wouldn't discourage you to enjoy it all you want.
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  #24  
Old 01-08-2010, 08:53 PM
uncle ebeneezer uncle ebeneezer is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

I agree. I usually just respond rather than analyze, but both are fun.

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There is music that reaches you and takes you to different levels and music that doesn't. Elvis doesn't do it for me... but I wouldn't discourage you to enjoy it all you want.
Some Elvis moves me, some doesn't.
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  #25  
Old 01-09-2010, 02:25 AM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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You can examine art forms analytically if you want. But there is a dimension to art that is essentially emotional and doesn't respond to the kind of argument you make. There is music that reaches you and takes you to different levels and music that doesn't. Elvis doesn't do it for me... but I wouldn't discourage you to enjoy it all you want.
Exactly right. I'm not an Elvis hater. It's just that he never did anything for me.

Maybe I came to him too late, but he never sounded like anything but a self-parody to me, even the early stuff. I can appreciate his contributions intellectually, I suppose, because many people whose taste I otherwise respect love him. But I have never been anything but mystified by the gushing.
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Old 01-08-2010, 02:06 PM
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by AemJeff View Post
One measure of someone's artistry is the downstream influence they have on their successors. By that measure, Elvis is unambiguously of the first rank.
By any measure, I think. I was never a super Elvis fan, but my sisters and I loved to watch his movies. And he did have 'it.' His 'Love Me Tender' especially reaches me.
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  #27  
Old 01-08-2010, 12:26 AM
Dee Sharp Dee Sharp is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

Khalid "Shake" Mohammed's dancing will offend the squares at first, but the younger jurors will love him, and the others will be won over by his charisma.
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  #28  
Old 01-08-2010, 03:38 AM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Khalid "Shake" Mohammed's dancing will offend the squares at first, but the younger jurors will love him, and the others will be won over by his charisma.
LOL!
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  #29  
Old 01-08-2010, 02:17 AM
basman basman is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

Forgive me, anyone who bothers to read this, for Im going to ramble, and with a healthy dose of nostalgia.

(BTW, I for one would be happy to have Wright do one of these on Bob Dylan and his suspicions about him with some Dylanophile contra.)

But I digress even before I begin. A lovely exchange this was on those parts of Elvis and his forbearers that I love. I have been to Graceland, his growing up house and his school in Memphis and his shotgun shack and church and school in Tupelo. I have been to Memphis at least half a dozen times in order to make that great triangular drive from Memphis to Clarksdale to Oxford and back to Memphis. Those trips and what I saw, experienced and learned have been amongst the joys of my life. Anyone who visits Sun cant help but be amazed that such volumes of brilliant, resonant music came out of such a down home, small-seeming place.

Its the essentially the Sun Elvis that I love. And Elviss forbearers I love include the great bluesmen who both preceded him and were his contemporaries such as, for one example, Arthur CrudupThats All right Mama for one-- and the brilliant R and B singers of his time like, for example, Junior Parkerfor an instance Mystery Train. (Elvis also loved the crooners like Bing Crosby and especially Dean Martin and first at Sun recorded for his mothers birthday a Dean Martin tuneI forget which one.) I mention Crudup and Parker and their specific tunes because Elvis wonderfully covered both songs, covers that stand up to the originals.

Stamaty was right on about Elvis as an appropriator of black music and in vehemently rejecting the base canard that he misappropriated it. I think Wrights theory of resentment of his explosive commercial success covering black music as an incubator of that intense lie sounds right to me.

An illuminating example of the perversity and twisted absurdity of this lie is Hound Dog as a prime example of this misappropriation. The charge is that Elvis ripped off Big Mama Thornton in covering it and so exploited black culture for his own profitable ends while Big Mama performed away in relative obscurity. Problem is that Hound Dog was written by Leiber and Stoller, two Jewish L.A. guys via Baltimore and Long Island, who met in high school: so much for Elvis ripping off black culture.

Anyway, Big Mama had no problem with white artists doing her material and was thrilled, for example, with Janis Joplins version of Ball and Chain. I don't know what she thought of Elvis doing Hound Dog. There is a vital argument as to whose Hound Dog is better: Elviss or Big Mamas. Me, I swing both ways on the point.

There is a parallel between Elviss facilitation of the popularity of black R and B and Rock and Rollnot so much, or, rather, not really at all the Blues thoughand the Beatles rejuvenation of R and B and Rock and Roll from the post Elvis insipidity to which it had descended with the likes of Frankie Avalon, Fabian, Booby Rydell, Brian Hyland and their ersatz brethren, and the Stones rejuvenation of the Blues. The Blues, though, because it is what it is, an enduring and profound art form, admittedly sank to certain levels of obscurity but never, never to insipidity.

Two final things:

Firstly, Im completely with Stamaty when he speaks of artists in true pursuit of the inner meaning of their art and shunning the false allure of the crass and soul destroying temptations of celebrity detached from artistic accomplishmenta point rightfully made about Tiger Woods by Wright, albeit in a different realm of human endeavor. That sentiment, Id argue, is a truth of the Blues.

Secondly and finally, I'm 63 born in 1946 and so came to Elvis as a 10 year old kid in the mid fifties in a similar way to how Stamaty did. Stamaty had the gift of his art with which to give outward expression and form to his exaltation. I, entirely ungifted, had to settle for the interior experience of sheer exaltation with no means really to give expression to it.

Last weekend, in fact, I was driving home and happened to catch a portion of an NPR interview with a poet and creative writing Prof. at FSU, David Kirby, who has just put out a book called Little Richard and the Birth of Rock and Roll. The interview so affected me that I found his FSU email address and wrote him the following note on my introduction to Elvis, Rock and Roll and eventually through Elvis to Little Richard.

Dear Mr. Kirby:

I had the unexpected pleasure of listening to you being interviewed on NPR this afternoon about your book on Little Richard.

I had just worked out and was driving home in Toronto on an icy, blustery day--I clean up at home-- sweaty and tired and was flipping though the radio dial. God smiled on me the day I discovered I could get NPR up here in the Canadian hinterland. I came in at about the first third of your interview. I got so engrossed that I just kept driving around till the interview was over so as not to miss any more of it.

I laughed at loud at Richard describing himself as the king and queen of Rock and Roll, at him saying its 'bam boom' not 'Pat Boone' and at the couplet, which I now cant remember, about how the record companies keep the money, something about I do the rockin and the slidin but they do the keepin' and the hidin.

Little Richard indirectly changed my world. I was born in 1946 and grew up for the second 6 years of my life in a place even colder than Toronto in the winterWinnipeg, Manitoba. My family was late to getting a television and Elvis had exploded onto the publics awareness and was performing on Ed Sullivan, which I kept hearing about but never saw.

I must have been about 10, in 1956, when one Saturday morning, I heard Elvis singing Tutti Frutti on the radio. The urgency and drive of it just compelled me and I felt like had discovered some part of myself that made sense to me. And I remember saying to myself something like "This is my music!" Elvis could put Tutti Frutti across the way the anodyne Pat Boone could not. And then after hearing Elvis I naturally got interested in it all, even as a little kid, and came to Little Richard. I thought he was crazy and weird and wonderful and brilliantly talented. I know some things about him, but I never knew he was crippled as you described it in the interview.

I liked very much your genial, home spun, Southern I'm guessing, manner. I liked your references to Greil Marcus's "old, weird America", a notion I've thought about from time to time--even though Greil Marcus is at times, too many I suppose, recondite to me. I liked your placing Little Richard in that tradition. And I liked your talk about Tutti Frutti changing the world in part by help breaking down racial divides in the Jim Crow U.S. South in the fifties and beyond. And I liked especially your description of Little Richard as a gay, black crippled kid from Macon Georgia changing the world.

I'm going to hunt up your book and give it a go and now that I've been introduced to you, I'll check out your poetry too.

Thanks for making my afternoon.

Sincerely,

Itzik Basman..

Itzik Basman (not to be confused with Itzik Basman)

Last edited by basman; 01-09-2010 at 12:50 AM..
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  #30  
Old 01-08-2010, 07:54 PM
rcocean rcocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

Basman - Great post!

You can argue that white musicians have been "ripping-off" black artists ever since the 1900s. I've read Irving Berlin was accused of stealing melodies from African Americans in the 1910s.

Certainly the pattern was for blacks to pioneer ragtime, jazz, bebop, R&B, rock and roll and for the whites to come along and copy and put on their own spin.

Aren't the Beatles and Stones derivative of American bands and singers that went before?

P.S. I've known several middle aged women in the 70s/80s who were Tom Jones fans. Do any men like Tom Jones or Neil Diamond (gag)? I don't.
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  #31  
Old 01-08-2010, 09:20 PM
Ken Davis Ken Davis is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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P.S. I've known several middle aged women in the 70s/80s who were Tom Jones fans. Do any men like Tom Jones or Neil Diamond (gag)? I don't.
I like Tom.
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  #32  
Old 01-08-2010, 09:47 PM
AemJeff AemJeff is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Nice vid. Another reason to like Tom Jones is that he's a cool unpretentious guy with a sense of humor about himself. (See Mars Attacks, for instance.)
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  #33  
Old 01-08-2010, 09:58 PM
uncle ebeneezer uncle ebeneezer is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

I think Love On the Rocks is a pretty awesome tune (I even cover it with a band and frequently bust it out for karaoke), but generally yeah Neil Diamond is Barbara Streisand with testicles (fanbase consisting almost solely of females or gay men.)
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  #34  
Old 01-08-2010, 10:23 PM
Ocean Ocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by uncle ebeneezer View Post
(fanbase consisting almost solely of females or gay men.)
This fanbase is for Neil or Barbara?

Seriously, there was one song by Neil Diamond that I used to really love, when I was really, really young, but I can't remember which one it is... (age!)
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  #35  
Old 01-08-2010, 10:33 PM
AemJeff AemJeff is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by uncle ebeneezer View Post
I think Love On the Rocks is a pretty awesome tune (I even cover it with a band and frequently bust it out for karaoke), but generally yeah Neil Diamond is Barbara Streisand with testicles (fanbase consisting almost solely of females or gay men.)
His status as a success out of the Brill Building (along with Bacharach, Hal David, Carole King, Leiber and Stoller, etc..., etc...) prevents me from harboring much ill will toward him; though, speaking as a diabetic, I generally need to be sure of an accesible insulin supply when I'm subjected to a performance.
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  #36  
Old 01-08-2010, 11:34 PM
rcocean rcocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by uncle ebeneezer View Post
I think Love On the Rocks is a pretty awesome tune (I even cover it with a band and frequently bust it out for karaoke), but generally yeah Neil Diamond is Barbara Streisand with testicles (fanbase consisting almost solely of females or gay men.)
What, Babs Streisand doesn't have Balls? I'll have to rewatch Yentl - I think I missed something.
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  #37  
Old 01-09-2010, 02:27 AM
uncle ebeneezer uncle ebeneezer is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

She had balls in Yentl, until the editor's cut (bu-dum-bum!)
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  #38  
Old 01-09-2010, 03:13 AM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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Originally Posted by rcocean View Post
Do any men like Tom Jones or Neil Diamond (gag)? I don't.
On TJ: When I was very young, I loved "What's New Pussycat?"

(Even before it became the soundtrack for a Purina commercial, I think.)

I was going to say Neil Diamond deserves absolution for Song Sung While Cracklin' Rosie's Sweet Caroline Blue (or something) due to procreating Mike D., but the Internets are unsure whether this truthiness has complete wikiality.
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Last edited by bjkeefe; 01-09-2010 at 03:28 AM..
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  #39  
Old 01-09-2010, 10:09 AM
Ocean Ocean is offline
 
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Default Re: Blue Suede Diavlog (Robert Wright & Mark Alan Stamaty)

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... , but the Internets are unsure whether this truthiness has complete wikiality.
LOL!
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  #40  
Old 01-08-2010, 03:13 AM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
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Unflappable.
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