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  #121  
Old 11-27-2009, 12:16 PM
handle handle is offline
 
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Quote:
Originally Posted by handle View Post
How many ways do I have to put this: the sum total of what you and I bring to this site is less than non-zero.
The difference between us is my keen sense of the obvious.

I understand you needing to save your energy to battle the fierce Sir Keef.
Don't look now, but your arm's off!

Godspeed, Sir Knight!
Sorry, I must correct my math here. In my haste to deploy a Bob-ism, I made a glaring error... my point is correctly expressed as:

the sum total of what you and I bring to this site isn't non-zero.
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  #122  
Old 11-28-2009, 12:44 AM
SkepticDoc SkepticDoc is offline
 
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Default Re: The Mind

From an Academic Neurologist
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  #123  
Old 11-28-2009, 06:13 PM
Alworth Alworth is offline
 
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Sorry I've been lax about joining the conversation.

Quote:
You have extrapolated "suffering" to extremes that really only exist in the margins of what I think Buddhist suffering is referring to. I see it more as the sufferings of the everyday, the everyman(woman). Its about dealing with the simple anxieties of life.
Actually, the suffering is related to the sense of self. (I'm talking Buddhist party-line here, not general philosophy. Much of what has been written seems accurate in different contexts.) When we have a sense of our self as being endangered, we suffer. This may be physical danger, or the sense of ourself. So while pain and suffering are related, the Buddhist sense of suffering is slightly different. My sense is that one of the reasons we feel pain, though, is to warn ourselves of danger. Pain isn't pleasant because evolutionarily, that wouldn't be as useful. So, in that way, it's similar.
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  #124  
Old 11-28-2009, 06:23 PM
Alworth Alworth is offline
 
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Quote:
Would you like to comment about the concept of "kalpa"?
It means essentially aeon or epoch. In both Hindu and Buddhist cosmology, big numbers are used to expand one's sense of things. It is both a mystical and actual time length, although since it's a traditional concept, it deviates from science quite a bit. I believe both Hindus and Buddhists have people populating distant kalpas, back when it was Lucy's land.

You can forgive a religion some of these details, though...
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  #125  
Old 11-28-2009, 06:33 PM
SkepticDoc SkepticDoc is offline
 
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

I was struck by the story of the boulder and the silk cloth:

From Wikipedia:

Quote:
2. Imagine a gigantic rocky mountain at the beginning of kalpa, approximately 16 x 16 x 16 miles (dwarfing Mt. Everest). You take a small piece of silk and wipe the mountain once every 100 years. According to the Buddha, the mountain will be completely depleted even before the kalpa ends.
A "little" more than the 6,000 years some religious fundamentalists in America accept...
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  #126  
Old 11-29-2009, 08:40 AM
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

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Originally Posted by SkepticDoc View Post
I was struck by the story of the boulder and the silk cloth:

From Wikipedia:



A "little" more than the 6,000 years some religious fundamentalists in America accept...
Cool story. How many religious fundamentalists actually believe the 6000 year BS? Are you yourself not comparing a "mountain" to a molehill?
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  #127  
Old 11-29-2009, 09:59 AM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

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Originally Posted by Whatfur View Post
Cool story. How many religious fundamentalists actually believe the 6000 year BS?
A recent survey in the UK showed: "one in three believe that God created the world within the past 10,000 years."

From the full report itself (PDF, via, via):

Quote:
According to a recent, detailed quantitative research study commissioned by Theos and conducted by the polling company ComRes ... 32% say that Young Earth Creationism (“the idea that God created the world sometime in the last 10,000 years”) is either definitely or probably true ...
and closely related:

Quote:
Since 1982, Gallup polls have been reporting the percentage of Americans who agree with the statement that “God created human beings pretty much in their present form at one time within the last 10,000 years or so.” From a figure of 42% in 1982, the percentages have oscillated between 43% and 47% ever since, with 44% recorded for 2008.
A different survey -- not fully randomized -- conducted between "2000 and 2004 in a large introductory biology course at the Twin Cities campus of the University of Minnesota" -- found seven percent of incoming students agreed with the statement: "I believe that Earth is 6,000 to 10,000 years old."
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  #128  
Old 11-29-2009, 12:18 PM
Bobby G Bobby G is offline
 
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Default Re: The Mind

Yeah, but the Belgian fellow has an almost entirely functioning brain, so I think Caplan's skepticism is off-base:

"It was only in 2006 that a scan revealed Mr Houben's brain was in fact almost entirely functioning."
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  #129  
Old 11-29-2009, 12:19 PM
Bobby G Bobby G is offline
 
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Default Re: The Mind

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
How prevalent do you think cases like that are? It sounds like a very rare occurrence.
It depends on what you mean by "cases like that". Cases where someone has almost full brain functioning? Who knows? Cases where people are misdiagnosed as "vegetables"? Quite a few:

"Mr Houben's story was revealed in a paper written by Steven Laureys, a doctor at Liege University.

"In it, Mr Laureys said that in about 40% of cases in which people were classified as being in a vegetative state, closer inspection revealed signs of consciousness."
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  #130  
Old 11-29-2009, 12:29 PM
SkepticDoc SkepticDoc is offline
 
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Default Re: The Mind

Did you read Shermer and Novella's articles/blogs?
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  #131  
Old 11-29-2009, 12:33 PM
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Default Re: The Mind

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby G View Post
It depends on what you mean by "cases like that". Cases where someone has almost full brain functioning? Who knows? Cases where people are misdiagnosed as "vegetables"? Quite a few:

"Mr Houben's story was revealed in a paper written by Steven Laureys, a doctor at Liege University.

"In it, Mr Laureys said that in about 40% of cases in which people were classified as being in a vegetative state, closer inspection revealed signs of consciousness."
"Signs of consciousness" is too vague a statement. I guess it all depends on the reason why you would want to determine whether someone may have any degree of consciousness. Even if we accept that there is a significant number of people that appear to be in a vegetative state, but that in fact, with more advanced technologies, we can detect some degree of consciousness, we still would have to determine what that means, its implications.

It is an interesting topic, though. And I can see the ethical implications that it may carry.
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  #132  
Old 11-29-2009, 03:02 PM
Wonderment Wonderment is offline
 
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Default Re: The Mind

Quote:
It is an interesting topic, though. And I can see the ethical implications that it may carry.
It is interesting from several vantage points, including the ethical issue for medical professionals who may acquiesce in "facilitated communicator" scams. Early detection of the scam seem to be very easy, and would spare family members a lot of pain in the long run when the scammer is exposed.

Of course, a misdiagnosis of "locked-in" syndrome would be awful, but apparently the misdiagnoses and the syndrome itself are very rare.

The diagnostic challenge seems to be (as SkepDoc's reference pointed out) the "gray area" between zero-consciousness coma and a little-bit-of-consciousness coma (some brain function, minimal responses to external stimuli, etc.).

Even if neurological science gets even better than it is already at knowing what's going on inside, in those borderline cases you'd still have to ask "Should I pull the plug if Mom still dreams, maybe recognizes some faces or a familiar touch, mumbles intelligible words sometimes, etc?" The easy answer to this one is educating people about advanced directives. But what about the people who say "Never pull the plug no matter what." Who decides then, and who pays the bills?

The other area of concern is the "miraculous recovery." A small handful of patients start to recover some function after extended comas (although signs of recovery, if recovery is at all likely, are almost always apparent early). The general recommendation seems to be more frequent reassessments (maybe every couple of years). Again, advanced directives help a lot.
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  #133  
Old 11-29-2009, 05:30 PM
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Default Re: The Mind

I pretty much agree with all of the above. That's why I raised the question about the meaning of finding some degree of consciousness. Intermittent stupor without an ability to command any of the voluntary functions sounds more like extreme suffering rather than a condition that we would want to prolong.
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  #134  
Old 11-29-2009, 07:28 PM
Wonderment Wonderment is offline
 
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Default Re: The Mind

Quote:
I pretty much agree with all of the above. That's why I raised the question about the meaning of finding some degree of consciousness. Intermittent stupor without an ability to command any of the voluntary functions sounds more like extreme suffering rather than a condition that we would want to prolong.
Here's the big ethical question, I think:

Suppose you have a 15-year-old child who is in a car accident. To keep the medical data simple, she's in a deep coma and the doctors say, "We can keep her comfortable, but it is unlikely that she will ever come out of it."

Naturally, you will say "How unlikely?" If the doc says, "Only one in 10 recover," of course you will do everything in your power to keep her on long-term life support, which costs -- let's say -- about $100,000/year. Probably you would at 1 in 100 too. But what about 1 in 1,000 or 1 in 10,000?

Personally, I would probably pull the plug at about 1 in 500 odds, but I'm just playing with my subjective sense of statistics here. Of course, you could leave it in the hands of some insurance company actuary who would give you the cost-benefit analysis (if we spend that $100,000 on malaria prevention, we'll save thousands of lives; plus we'll harvest her organs for transplants), but is that enough to resolve your ethical dilemma of taking your child off life support?
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  #135  
Old 11-29-2009, 07:48 PM
SkepticDoc SkepticDoc is offline
 
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Default Re: The Mind

The problem is that few people want to think about the hard decisions, even when they are infrequent.

This may shed some light on some of the issues:

http://www.propublica.org/feature/ad...ntilators-1123

The problems with Katrina were real, and nobody was prepared. the scare tactics of "Death Panels" have not helped the issues.

Tom Flynn wrote this article, I don't know where he really stands.

Peter Singer's NYT article

Maybe the first step is to accept that we will all die, if we are lucky, we may have some control over the circumstances.
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  #136  
Old 11-29-2009, 08:48 PM
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Default Re: The Mind

SkepticDoc had a good point about Death Panel's hysteria being an obstacle for this kind of discussion. But, I would hope that there will be a day, after health care is passed, when these topics stop being so politically charged and they can be discussed more rationally. There are all kinds of possibilities.
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  #137  
Old 12-01-2009, 09:16 PM
SkepticDoc SkepticDoc is offline
 
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Default Re: Link to diavlog ...

Another link:

Center for Buddhist Studies at Columbia

The podcasts are worth exploring.

And:

http://www.urbandharma.org/kusala/dad.html

Last edited by SkepticDoc; 12-01-2009 at 11:54 PM..
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  #138  
Old 12-16-2009, 03:12 PM
popcorn_karate popcorn_karate is offline
 
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
I can experience awe when I encounter natural beauty or the magnificence of some works of art. Look at a starry night and dare not to be humbled by it! What does that have to do with any particular set of beliefs?

Why does compassion have to be linked to religious beliefs?
its not about belief, but connection, hence the "com" with the "passion". That sense of connection to everything seems like the essence of spirituality, if not dogma or "religion".

when you do feel that connection, what are you connecting with? are you connecting to atoms? or is there a sense of some greater whole?
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  #139  
Old 12-16-2009, 04:53 PM
SkepticDoc SkepticDoc is offline
 
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Happiness without meditation
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  #140  
Old 12-16-2009, 06:12 PM
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True. Laughter is infectious! Do you ever laugh until you abdominal muscles hurt?

Now, that last passenger with glasses that got on the train, is he one of our commenters?
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  #141  
Old 12-16-2009, 06:17 PM
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

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Originally Posted by popcorn_karate View Post
its not about belief, but connection, hence the "com" with the "passion". That sense of connection to everything seems like the essence of spirituality, if not dogma or "religion".

when you do feel that connection, what are you connecting with? are you connecting to atoms? or is there a sense of some greater whole?
I consider that connection a state of mind that is elicited by certain situations, people, etc.

Perhaps you want to expand in what you mean by 'greater whole'.
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  #142  
Old 12-16-2009, 07:15 PM
popcorn_karate popcorn_karate is offline
 
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

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Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
I consider that connection a state of mind that is elicited by certain situations, people, etc.
so the sense of connection is an illusion since you are not connecting with anything?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
Perhaps you want to expand in what you mean by 'greater whole'.
nope. i just tried a few times (written and deleted before posting) and wasn't satisfied with my efforts. maybe another day.
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  #143  
Old 12-16-2009, 07:38 PM
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Quote:
Originally Posted by popcorn_karate View Post
so the sense of connection is an illusion since you are not connecting with anything?



nope. i just tried a few times (written and deleted before posting) and wasn't satisfied with my efforts. maybe another day.
Yes, if you are trying to articulate something that may be too abstract, it can be frustrating.

As to the first part, asking whether that sense of connection is an illusion, I don't have a straightforward answer. It all depends on what you mean by illusion.

It is understood that a newborn baby does not experience himself as separate from the influx of stimuli coming from his surroundings. His own body parts, physiological sensations, objects and people in his line of sight or range of hearing are all one chaotic flow. With time, through sensory integration and experience he will become aware of its own physical separateness. Later on, there will be a sense of psychological identity. So normal development goes from 'unity' to separateness. It seems that many Eastern practices may call for the abandonment of this sense of separateness by working backwards in that development. By abandoning all the constructs attached to the experience of individuality, I guess you could reach a state of dissolution of the ego (sense of self) and therefore a sense of unity (the early experience) or even emptiness.

But I don't even know that's what you are talking about. And truly, what do I know? I'm just speculating/guessing about a topic I know very little about.
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  #144  
Old 12-16-2009, 09:54 PM
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My older brother and I used to do the same thing with yawns on buses. Laughter WOULD have been a better trick. Thanks for sharing.
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  #145  
Old 12-17-2009, 02:50 PM
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Good story. Non-Chinese do stick out in China. People love to stare, sell you stuff, or just interact with you.
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  #146  
Old 01-01-2010, 01:14 PM
SkepticDoc SkepticDoc is offline
 
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Default Money

We all worry about it, how to get it, how to spend it, how to save it...

I have not had a lot of exposure to requests for donations for Buddhist organizations (probably prohibited by the Sangha rules?), Baltimoron could you elaborate on your wife's comment?

Quote:
As my non-practicing Buddhist wife says: it's all fine and dandy until money's involved!
After "surviving" the end-of-the-year requests for donations (ACLU, Wikipedia) and the regular requests for donations from almost every "organization" (JREF, CFI, the first secular groups that come to mind!), I ponder what is the best approach to balance the dilemma.

Do we follow Carnegie's example, make as much as possible even at the expense of the lives of workers (Homestead) and then give it away through foundations?
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  #147  
Old 01-01-2010, 02:03 PM
claymisher claymisher is offline
 
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Default Re: Money

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Originally Posted by SkepticDoc View Post
We all worry about it, how to get it, how to spend it, how to save it...

I have not had a lot of exposure to requests for donations for Buddhist organizations (probably prohibited by the Sangha rules?), Baltimoron could you elaborate on your wife's comment?



After "surviving" the end-of-the-year requests for donations (ACLU, Wikipedia) and the regular requests for donations from almost every "organization" (JREF, CFI, the first secular groups that come to mind!), I ponder what is the best approach to balance the dilemma.

Do we follow Carnegie's example, make as much as possible even at the expense of the lives of workers (Homestead) and then give it away through foundations?
A friend of mine donates to CARE because they never ask him for more money.

I use bill payer for everything and never open my mail. That system works pretty good until somebody sends you a check!
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  #148  
Old 01-13-2010, 03:08 PM
SkepticDoc SkepticDoc is offline
 
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Default More links, Peer-reviewed publications

Mindfulness Research Update 2008
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  #149  
Old 02-19-2010, 01:09 PM
SkepticDoc SkepticDoc is offline
 
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Default Re: The Mind

update:

http://www.theness.com/neurologicablog/?p=1596
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  #150  
Old 03-26-2010, 07:21 AM
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Scholarly journal:

http://www.springer.com/psychology/journal/12671
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  #151  
Old 04-07-2010, 07:55 AM
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Default 14 Mindfulness teachings

From http://www.iamhome.org/about.htm

Quote:
The Fourteen Mindfulness Trainings Introduction
(from Interbeing by Thich Nhat Hanh)

1. The First Mindfulness Training: Openness
Aware of the suffering created by fanaticism and intolerance, we are determined not to be idolatrous about or bound to any doctrine, theory, or ideology, even Buddhist ones. Buddhist teachings are guiding means to help us learn to look deeply and to develop our understanding and compassion. They are not doctrines to fight, kill, or die for.

2. The Second Mindfulness Training: Nonattachment from Views
Aware of the suffering created by attachment to views and wrong perceptions, we are determined to avoid being narrow-minded and bound to present views. We shall learn and practice nonattachment from views in order to be open to others’ insights and experiences. We are aware that the knowledge we presently possess is not changeless, absolute truth. Truth is found in life, and we will observe life within and around us in every moment, ready to learn throughout our lives.

3. The Third Mindfulness Training: Freedom of Thought
Aware of the suffering brought about when we impose our views on others, we are committed not to force others, even our children, by any means whatsoever - such as authority, threat, money, propaganda, or indoctrination - to adopt our views. We will respect the right of others to be different and to choose what to believe and how to decide. We will, however, help others renounce fanaticism and narrowness through practicing deeply and engaging in compassionate dialogue.

4. The Fourth Mindfulness Training: Awareness of Suffering
Aware that looking deeply at the nature of suffering can help us develop compassion and find ways out of suffering, we are determined not to avoid or close our eyes before suffering. We are committed to finding ways, including personal contact, images, and sounds, to be with those who suffer, so we can understand their situation deeply and help them transform their suffering into compassion, peace, and joy.

5. The Fifth Mindfulness Training: Simple, Healthy Living
Aware that true happiness is rooted in peace, solidity, freedom, and compassion, and not in wealth or fame, we are determined not to take as the aim of our life fame, profit, wealth, or sensual pleasure, nor to accumulate wealth while millions are hungry and dying. We are committed to living simply and sharing our time, energy, and material resources with those in need. We will practice mindful consuming, not using alcohol, drugs, or any other products that bring toxins into our own and the collective body and consciousness.

6. The Sixth Mindfulness Training: Dealing with Anger
Aware that anger blocks communication and creates suffering, we are determined to take care of the energy of anger when it arises and to recognize and transform the seeds of anger that lie deep in our consciousness. When anger comes up, we are determined not to do or say anything, but to practice mindful breathing or mindful walking and acknowledge, embrace, and look deeply into our anger. We will learn to look with the eyes of compassion at ourselves and at those we think are the cause of our anger.

7. The Seventh Mindfulness Training: Dwelling Happily in the Present Moment
Aware that life is available only in the present moment and that it is possible to live happily in the here and now, we are committed to training ourselves to live deeply each moment of daily life. We will try not to lose ourselves in dispersion or be carried away by regrets about the past, worries about the future, or craving, anger, or jealousy in the present. We will practice mindful breathing to come back to what is happening in the present moment. We are determined to learn the art of mindful living by touching the wondrous, refreshing, and healing elements that are inside and around us, and by nourishing seeds of joy, peace, love, and understanding in ourselves, thus facilitating the work of transformation and healing in our consciousness.

8. The Eighth Mindfulness Training: Community and Communication
Aware that lack of communication always brings separation and suffering, we are committed to training ourselves in the practice of compassionate listening and loving speech. We will learn to listen deeply without judging or reacting and refrain from uttering words that can create discord or cause the community to break. We will make every effort to keep communications open and to reconcile and resolve all conflicts, however small.

9. The Ninth Mindfulness Training: Truthful and Loving Speech
Aware that words can create suffering or happiness, we are committed to learning to speak truthfully and constructively, using only words that inspire hope and confidence. We are determined not to say untruthful things for the sake of personal interest or to impress people, nor to utter words that might cause division or hatred. We will not spread news that we do not know to be certain nor criticize or condemn things of which we are not sure. We will do our best to speak out about situations of injustice, even when doing so may threaten our safety.

10. The Tenth Mindfulness Training: Protecting the Sangha
Aware that the essence and aim of a Sangha is the practice of understanding and compassion, we are determined not to use the Buddhist community for personal gain or profit or transform our community into a political instrument. A spiritual community should, however, take a clear stand against oppression and injustice and should strive to change the situation without engaging in partisan conflicts.

11. The Eleventh Mindfulness Training: Right Livelihood
Aware that great violence and injustice have been done to our environment and society, we are committed not to live with a vocation that is harmful to humans and nature. We will do our best to select a livelihood that helps realize our ideal of understanding and compassion. Aware of global economic, political and social realities, we will behave responsibly as consumers and as citizens, not supporting companies that deprive others of their chance to live.

12. The Twelfth Mindfulness Training: Reverence for Life
Aware that much suffering is caused by war and conflict, we are determined to cultivate nonviolence, understanding, and compassion in our daily lives, to promote peace education, mindful mediation, and reconciliation within families, communities, nations, and in the world. We are determined not to kill and not to let others kill. We will diligently practice deep looking with our Sangha to discover better ways to protect life and prevent war.

13. The Thirteenth Mindfulness Training: Generosity
Aware of the suffering caused by exploitation, social injustice, stealing, and oppression, we are committed to cultivating loving kindness and learning ways to work for the well-being of people, animals, plants, and minerals. We will practice generosity by sharing our time, energy, and material resources with those who are in need. We are determined not to steal and not to possess anything that should belong to others. We will respect the property of others, but will try to prevent others from profiting from human suffering or the suffering of other beings.

14. The Fourteenth Mindfulness Training: Right Conduct
(For lay members): Aware that sexual relations motivated by craving cannot dissipate the feeling of loneliness but will create more suffering, frustration, and isolation, we are determined not to engage in sexual relations without mutual understanding, love, and a long-term commitment. In sexual relations, we must be aware of future suffering that may be caused. We know that to preserve the happiness of ourselves and others, we must respect the rights and commitments of ourselves and others. We will do everything in our power to protect children from sexual abuse and to protect couples and families from being broken by sexual misconduct. We will treat our bodies with respect and preserve our vital energies (sexual, breath, spirit) for the realization of our bodhisattva ideal. We will be fully aware of the responsibility of bringing new lives into the world, and will meditate on the world into which we are bringing new beings.

(For monastic members): Aware that the aspiration of a monk or a nun can only be realized when he or she wholly leaves behind the bonds of worldly love, we are committed to practicing chastity and to helping others protect themselves. We are aware that loneliness and suffering cannot be alleviated by the coming together of two bodies in a sexual relationship, but by the practice of true understanding and compassion. We know that a sexual relationship will destroy our life as a monk or a nun, will prevent us from realizing our ideal of serving living beings, and will harm others. We are determined not to suppress or mistreat our body or to look upon our body as only an instrument, but to learn to handle our body with respect. We are determined to preserve vital energies (sexual, breath, spirit) for the realization of our bodhisattva ideal
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  #152  
Old 04-07-2010, 02:57 PM
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Thanks for this diavlog. (I only just now got to watching it.) It's too bad the conversation had to be so brief.

As a non-practicing non-Buddhist (is that possible?), it's all too easy for me in my daily life to lose sight of the valuable insights, wisdom and way of experiencing oneself in relation to the world that Buddhism has to offer. It was good to hear about and be reminded of that.
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  #153  
Old 04-07-2010, 03:12 PM
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Mindfulness transcends any religious belief, you don't have to be a Buddhist to practice.

Maybe we should have another conversation to cover these issues, in a lecture in London, the Dalai Lama stated something to the effect of:

don't change what you are, work to be the best that you can be

(I apologize, I am terrible at paraphrasing or recalling the exact words!)
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  #154  
Old 04-08-2010, 06:30 PM
SkepticDoc SkepticDoc is offline
 
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

YouTube videos on Clinical applications of mindfulness:

http://www.youtube.com/user/FACESCon.../0/3L1iuXQuqes

FACES Conferences

"We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts.
With our thoughts we make the world."
--Dhammapada (tr. Byrom, 1993)
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  #155  
Old 04-09-2010, 05:05 AM
listener listener is offline
 
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
True. Laughter is infectious! Do you ever laugh until you abdominal muscles hurt?

Now, that last passenger with glasses that got on the train, is he one of our commenters?
I watched this today, it was delightful, I passed it on to some of my friends.
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  #156  
Old 04-09-2010, 07:23 AM
Ocean Ocean is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: US Northeast
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Quote:
Originally Posted by listener View Post
I watched this today, it was delightful, I passed it on to some of my friends.
You have now an alternative to your "trololololo..." guy!
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  #157  
Old 04-09-2010, 03:34 PM
listener listener is offline
 
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Default Re: Mindfulness in Medicine (Alworth & SkepticDoc)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
You have now an alternative to your "trololololo..." guy!
True!
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  #158  
Old 04-22-2010, 07:15 PM
SkepticDoc SkepticDoc is offline
 
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Location: Argleton
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Default Re: More links...

If you are in a hurry:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/chadem..._b_479060.html

More about Meng:

http://www.chademeng.com/
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