Go Back   Bloggingheads Community > Diavlog comments
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Notices

Diavlog comments Post comments about particular diavlogs here.
(Users cannot create new threads.)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 02-05-2010, 01:40 PM
Florian Florian is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 2,118
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjkeefe View Post
Also, I have no problem with spending time each day just purely being made to laugh, even if tomorrow I don't remember why.

And finally, I guess in many ways, I view myself as ephemeral, so it does not particularly matter to me that I am not always concentrating on the timeless.

Hey everybody, let's have some fun
You only live for once
And when you're dead you're done
So let the good times roll


And finally, I guess in many ways, I view myself as ephemeral, so it does not particularly matter to me that I am not always concentrating on the timeless..

Hey everybody, let's have some fun
You only live for once
And when you're dead you're done
So let the good times roll[/I]

as the man sang.
Carpe diem is a philosophy for virgins and rock bands. Between the ephemeral and the timeless there is room for all kinds of things unknown to virgins and rock bands.

Robert Herrick "To the Virgins"

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying:
And this same flower that smiles to-day
To-morrow will be dying.

The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,
The higher he's a-getting,
The sooner will his race be run,
And nearer he's to setting.

That age is best which is the first,
When youth and blood are warmer;
But being spent, the worse, and worst
Times still succeed the former.

Then be not coy, but use your time,
And while ye may, go marry:
For having lost but once your prime,
You may for ever tarry.
To-morrow will be dying.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 02-05-2010, 01:47 PM
Florian Florian is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 2,118
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by look View Post
Thanks. I read the first page of Moby Dick and was amazed at how accessible it seemed. I want to read it, but it seems such a daunting committment. Maybe you could lead us in a book discussion? Or perhaps one on Hannah Arendt's book comparing the French Revolution to the American?
That would be fun, but I wonder how many serious readers there are in this forum. Arendt might be daunting to those uninitiated to a certain German heaviness.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 02-05-2010, 01:53 PM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Not Real America, according to St. SaŽah
Posts: 21,798
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by look View Post
B, be a doll and find Nate's Oscar/Felix vid. I tried, but couldn't find it.
Hmmm ... that was directed to be taken down due to some copyright nonsense, wasn't it? I sure do wish I had grabbed a copy of it, because I've never seen it anywhere else.

Best bet is probably to send Nate a PM. Or hope someone who knows more about searching for video than I do sees your post. Sorry I don't have more to offer.
__________________
Brendan
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 02-05-2010, 02:05 PM
look look is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 2,886
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Florian View Post
That would be fun, but I wonder how many serious readers there are in this forum. Arendt might be daunting to those uninitiated to a certain German heaviness.
Yes, I don't even know if I could handle her. Briefly, how do you compare them? I realize it may be too tedious a subject for now, so perhaps another time...
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 02-05-2010, 02:06 PM
look look is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 2,886
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjkeefe View Post
Hmmm ... that was directed to be taken down due to some copyright nonsense, wasn't it? I sure do wish I had grabbed a copy of it, because I've never seen it anywhere else.

Best bet is probably to send Nate a PM. Or hope someone who knows more about searching for video than I do sees your post. Sorry I don't have more to offer.
Yes, good idea.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 02-05-2010, 02:11 PM
bjkeefe bjkeefe is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Not Real America, according to St. SaŽah
Posts: 21,798
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Dum loquimur invida aetas fugerit.
__________________
Brendan
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 02-05-2010, 02:26 PM
claymisher claymisher is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Newbridge, NJ
Posts: 2,673
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Florian View Post
That would be fun, but I wonder how many serious readers there are in this forum. Arendt might be daunting to those uninitiated to a certain German heaviness.
Arendt's easy. How about "The Phenomenology of Spirit?"
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 02-05-2010, 02:29 PM
Florian Florian is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 2,118
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjkeefe View Post
Dum loquimur invida aetas fugerit.
You took the words right out of Horace's mouth. So true: while we're speaking invidious time is fleeing. But even truer: Primum vivere, deinde philosophari.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 02-05-2010, 03:33 PM
nikkibong nikkibong is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 1,803
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Florian View Post
I read little fiction, American or other. Franco is no longer communicating with me, so I am unsure of his tastes. Besides, he is a bit of snob.

A while ago I read The Tunnel by William Gass and Delillo's Underworld...both in the tradition of the great never to be written (and probably never to be read) American novel. Moby Dick to the nth degree. I have no idea what younger American writers are up to. Among contemporary British writers I enjoy Ian McEwan.
No way is this Franco! I can't imagine someone as well-educated and intelligent as he reading as middlebrow a writer as Ian McEwan...(although The Child In Time, his magnum opus, is really quite good.)

Contemporary British writers? - David Lodge is more entertaining, more interesting, and, altogether - in his offbeat way - more serious than McEwan.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 02-05-2010, 04:49 PM
look look is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 2,886
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by claymisher View Post
Arendt's easy. How about "The Phenomenology of Spirit?"
Looking at the wiki page it looks fascinating, but beyond my level of understanding of philosophy, which is near nil. Thanks anyway.
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 02-05-2010, 05:53 PM
uncle ebeneezer uncle ebeneezer is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,332
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Atonement (the book) was amazing!! And Saturday was pretty great too, imo. Nikki's the real snob here.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 02-05-2010, 07:55 PM
Me&theboys Me&theboys is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 447
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by look View Post
I really dislike reading in front of a PC, but since I got a laptop it's not a problem. I wonder if Me& or BN ever upgraded to the new Kindle. I heard that in some ways they're not as good as the original.

I understand that Edith Wharton would write page after page, flowingly, while in bed. As she finished each page she would drop it on the floor for her maid to gather up later.
I did not upgrade. Sometimes I think about it, but I don't see much added value. I love my ugly old early adopter version with the cardboard and tape that I use to prevent myself from hitting the next page button inadvertently. I'm more interested in a Kindle software upgrade than a hardware upgrade. Ebooks are still very poor for non-fiction reading that involves references and footnotes. Amazon needs to figure out how to link to the references/footnotes from the text and vice versa, which is easily done in a regular book; impossible on a Kindle AFAIK. Was in barnes and noble the other night and looked at their ebook the Nook. Looked like the new Kindle. Was not very compelling to me, but the cases they have are MUCH better than the Kindle cases. That alone almost convinced me to switch. A hot pink pleather envelope case will get me every time.

I love paper books and buy them as if money grows on trees because I feel compelled to own them, but nothing beats the Kindle if you are a little bit ADD about reading material and like to have something at your fingertips when the mood strikes, especially when traveling. Plus you can download a free sample of a chapter or two, which is like browsing in a bookstore.

Amazon shoud make a deal with Elsevier Science and others to put their journal subscriptions on the Kindle. They should also make a deal to sell the Kindle versions of books at a discount if you buy the actual book from them and vice versa. They do offer an "electronic" version of some books you buy, but you have to read them on your computer or laptop, which DOES NOT COMPARE to reading on a Kindle. Reading on a Kindle really is a lot like reading a book. Amazon does have a Kindle app for the iPhone, which is cool, but kind of pointless if you have a Kindle, which is a pre-requisite for getting the app to work.

I could go on and on......have I succeeded in talking you into buying one?
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 02-06-2010, 03:50 AM
Florian Florian is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 2,118
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by claymisher View Post
Arendt's easy. How about "The Phenomenology of Spirit?"
I ploughed through the Phenomenology once, with the help of a French translation and two French commentaries. But I didn't become God as Hegel promised.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 02-06-2010, 03:54 AM
Florian Florian is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 2,118
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by nikkibong View Post
No way is this Franco! I can't imagine someone as well-educated and intelligent as he reading as middlebrow a writer as Ian McEwan...(although The Child In Time, his magnum opus, is really quite good.)

Contemporary British writers? - David Lodge is more entertaining, more interesting, and, altogether - in his offbeat way - more serious than McEwan.
Would that America had such good middlebrow writers. But you're right, Franco would tut tut me.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 02-06-2010, 03:29 PM
thornybranch thornybranch is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 44
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

This pair is remarkably non-articulate for being professional writers.

Maybe there's Something... Different about this computer screen that causes their Fibberty-Gibberty-Ness
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 02-07-2010, 03:17 PM
nautirony nautirony is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 49
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

I agree with bjkeefe that this is a very pleasant listen. While there is nothing particularly ground-breaking here, there are a lot of things that were alluded to (structure of reading/writing, for example) that are worthwhile thinking about.

I hope Bob would bring more of people working in particular areas (writers, scientists, philosophers, public officials, rights organizers) and give them a pleasant platform where they could (somewhat freely) express their ideas even when they don't have a book to promote...
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 02-09-2010, 12:54 PM
look look is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 2,886
Default Re: Writing in the Digital Age (Susan Orlean & Kurt Andersen)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Me&theboys View Post
I did not upgrade. Sometimes I think about it, but I don't see much added value. I love my ugly old early adopter version with the cardboard and tape that I use to prevent myself from hitting the next page button inadvertently. I'm more interested in a Kindle software upgrade than a hardware upgrade. Ebooks are still very poor for non-fiction reading that involves references and footnotes. Amazon needs to figure out how to link to the references/footnotes from the text and vice versa, which is easily done in a regular book; impossible on a Kindle AFAIK. Was in barnes and noble the other night and looked at their ebook the Nook. Looked like the new Kindle. Was not very compelling to me, but the cases they have are MUCH better than the Kindle cases. That alone almost convinced me to switch. A hot pink pleather envelope case will get me every time.

I love paper books and buy them as if money grows on trees because I feel compelled to own them, but nothing beats the Kindle if you are a little bit ADD about reading material and like to have something at your fingertips when the mood strikes, especially when traveling. Plus you can download a free sample of a chapter or two, which is like browsing in a bookstore.

Amazon shoud make a deal with Elsevier Science and others to put their journal subscriptions on the Kindle. They should also make a deal to sell the Kindle versions of books at a discount if you buy the actual book from them and vice versa. They do offer an "electronic" version of some books you buy, but you have to read them on your computer or laptop, which DOES NOT COMPARE to reading on a Kindle. Reading on a Kindle really is a lot like reading a book. Amazon does have a Kindle app for the iPhone, which is cool, but kind of pointless if you have a Kindle, which is a pre-requisite for getting the app to work.

I could go on and on......have I succeeded in talking you into buying one?
Thank for the reply, but no, since I now have a laptop, I consider that convenience enough...except when losing phone lines during the snowcoptalypse. My first purchase will be one of those gizmos you stick on your laptop, that receives satellite.

As far a colors, I'm a sucker for hot spring green...but at least we coordinate!

Reply With Quote
 


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.