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Old 12-30-2011, 11:32 PM
TwinSwords TwinSwords is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Heartland Conservative
Posts: 4,933
Default Re: The Bromance (John McWhorter & Glenn Loury)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonderment View Post
You think there's a conspiracy afoot in American politics to "wipe out democracy"?
No. I said that wiping out democracy is the goal to which Ron Paul is really committed. It's not something he often states explicitly, and I honestly don't think most of his more casual followers really understand the extreme scope of his anti-government agenda. But if you pay attention to what he says, he doesn't conceal his anti-government and anti-democracy position, either. He is very careful to express his views in the most appealing way to lure as many different constituencies into his camp as he can, but everything he stands for traces back to his basic belief that government (with very limited exceptions) should be wiped out. If you wipe out government, you basically are wiping out democracy. If you deem everything to be unconstitutional, you're telling the population, "Sorry! You can't use government to do anything; you have no government." So, if you want to regulate the speed of traffic or workplace safety or consumer safety or product safety or any form of trade, too bad; you can't. His agenda is to make us all slaves to the tyranny of unchecked private power -- the exact known result when government is eliminated. If you doubt this, look at his support for Jim Crow: Ron Paul is a guy who looked upon the apartheid south and was offended -- not by the apartheid, but by the meddling efforts of a federal government that interfered with the freedom of individuals to refuse blacks access to society.

Government is highly imperfect, as we all know. And in the present era, it has almost entirely been captured by corporate and other wealthy interests. But even in this highly imperfect form, (a) it is still at least somewhat responsive to the will of the population, and (b) the potential always exists to improve it, and to make it more responsive to the will of the people, and (c) there are still a lot of laws on the books left over from a less extreme period in American history (the early- and mid-20th century) that provide important protection for the population. So, if you doubt that even our imperfect government still provides critical protection from untrammelled private power, just wait until you see what Republicans repeal and rollback in the years ahead.

Maybe this is news to you. Maybe you haven't interacted with enough Ron Paul people, or maybe you don't know enough real libertarians, but hatred of democracy and a belief that the government should almost entirely be eliminated is standard fare among the Ron Paul types. It is Ron Paul, the Rothbardian Libertarians, and the Ron Paul followers who go around insisting, constantly, that "the US is not a democracy; it's a Republic." That particular search query returns over 1 million results, so this should not be news to anyone.

The basic Rothbarian idea, embraced in total by Ron Paul, is that almost everything the government does is illegal. So, yes, you could still vote, but it would be a mere formality, because the courts in Ron Paul's idea of a properly functioning system would smash any legislation that exceeded the bounds of a very limited conception of constitutionality.

Here's Ayn Rand acolyte and libertarian thinker Leonard Peikoff on democracy:

"The American system is a constitutionally limited republic, restricted to the protection of individual rights. In such a system, majority rule is applicable only to lesser details, such as the selection of certain personnel. But the majority has no say over the basic principles governing the government. It has no power to ask for or gain the infringement of individual rights."
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"All for ourselves, and nothing for other people, seems, in every age of the world, to have been the vile maxim of the masters of mankind." -- Adam Smith
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