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View Full Version : The die is cast: Netflix is the next disrupter to lay waste..


JonIrenicus
03-21-2011, 04:11 AM
to the old model of an industry

http://www.businessinsider.com/netflix-and-tv-20-2011-3


It started with mp3 and music, then craigslist to newspaper classifieds, and now netflix to the traditional broadcast model. On that last, I won't miss what it replaces. The netflix model is the superior more enjoyable model.


I just wish the holdouts would yield faster.

bjkeefe
03-21-2011, 05:54 AM
to the old model of an industry

http://www.businessinsider.com/netflix-and-tv-20-2011-3

From a link (http://blog.netflix.com/2011/03/house-of-cards.html) within:

... the first exclusive TV series to originate on Netflix.

Whoa.

Even as a committed non-watcher of the teevee, I have some sense of how (potentially) huge this is.

It started with mp3 and music, then craigslist to newspaper classifieds, and now netflix to the traditional broadcast model. On that last, I won't miss what it replaces. The netflix model is the superior more enjoyable model.

Starting quite a while ago, I often thought, when a hot new teevee show started, "Eh, no need to feel like I'm missing out. I can always watch it on Netflix." I must have heard this said by just about everyone I know at some point or another.

I do think a little something is lost in the sense of everyone watching the same new hot show at the same time -- the "water-cooler buzz," as the cliché would have it. But I am hard-pressed to say that this is something important. I have long thought that people talked about teevee shows primarily out of lack of anything better to talk about, and that this was yet another symptom of our decaying society. Maybe, just maybe, this further fragmentation of interests in the passive consumption realm will lead to more engagement on topics of active interest. Could happen!

I just wish the holdouts would yield faster.

Why? Who cares? How are they affecting you? (Serious questions; not being dismissive.)

I am actually a little worried that Netflix seems to be the only game in town, at least as far as this being the next big thing in this one arena goes. In that sense, I wonder if it wouldn't be better for the dinosaurs to hang on for a bit, to give a chance for some other competitors to take a shot at getting established.

JonIrenicus
03-21-2011, 03:26 PM
Why? Who cares? How are they affecting you? (Serious questions; not being dismissive.)

I am actually a little worried that Netflix seems to be the only game in town, at least as far as this being the next big thing in this one arena goes. In that sense, I wonder if it wouldn't be better for the dinosaurs to hang on for a bit, to give a chance for some other competitors to take a shot at getting established.



I want the holdouts to go away faster because they are slowing the transition to a more on demand model, where you can access content you paid for whenever/wherever.

Even bloggingheads is an on demand model, when stuff is put up it is then available from now till forever, wherever you want (...from a computer/phone)



Hmm, now that I think about it, I wonder how bloggingheads would be received if there was access to the videos through netflix?

It would branch netflix offerings into more up to date coverage of recent events, and may drive traffic to bloggingheads in order to post on the forums. Not sure what the licensing/ad situation would be though, but eyeballs > most things I think.

operative
03-21-2011, 10:22 PM
From a link (http://blog.netflix.com/2011/03/house-of-cards.html) within:



Whoa.

Even as a committed non-watcher of the teevee, I have some sense of how (potentially) huge this is.



Starting quite a while ago, I often thought, when a hot new teevee show started, "Eh, no need to feel like I'm missing out. I can always watch it on Netflix." I must have heard this said by just about everyone I know at some point or another.

I do think a little something is lost in the sense of everyone watching the same new hot show at the same time -- the "water-cooler buzz," as the cliché would have it. But I am hard-pressed to say that this is something important. I have long thought that people talked about teevee shows primarily out of lack of anything better to talk about, and that this was yet another symptom of our decaying society. Maybe, just maybe, this further fragmentation of interests in the passive consumption realm will lead to more engagement on topics of active interest. Could happen!



Why? Who cares? How are they affecting you? (Serious questions; not being dismissive.)

I am actually a little worried that Netflix seems to be the only game in town, at least as far as this being the next big thing in this one arena goes. In that sense, I wonder if it wouldn't be better for the dinosaurs to hang on for a bit, to give a chance for some other competitors to take a shot at getting established.

I don't think it's all that uncommon for a newer, better company to run the competition out of town before new competition arises. It seems that right now no one understands the business like Netflix--Blockbuster couldn't even thrive on a mail delivery system, let alone being able to rival Netflix in streaming. But there will inevitably be competition, because there will inevitably be room in the market.