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Lyle
08-16-2010, 12:17 AM
Well, well, well (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/13/AR2010081305220.html?nav=rss_opinion/columns) ...

"If you had to choose between saving a girl's life or enabling her to go to school, which would you do first?" This was Afghan President Hamid Karzai's reply when I asked him last month if the rights of Afghan women might be sacrificed for a peace settlement with the Taliban.

.... Some suspect that talking about women's rights is a pretext for keeping the United States in Afghanistan forever (ironically, the part of President Obama's constituency that would normally be most concerned about defending women in Afghanistan is also the part most wary of the U.S. commitment there). But whether one believes in Gen. David Petraeus's strategy of counterinsurgency for as long as it takes, or a more limited counterterrorism mission with fewer troops, there is no need for hasty deals that give the Taliban a share of power.

Whatever one's vision of the way forward in Afghanistan, the answer to Karzai's heartfelt question must be: You must help that girl stay alive and go to school at the same time. For if you try to settle the conflict in a way that sacrifices human rights in the name of peace, you will end up with neither.

Wonderment
08-16-2010, 12:50 AM
I agree that this is a troubling HRW editorial.

After growing the Mujaheedin thugs that morphed into the Taliban government, the USA is suddenly (post 9/11) worried about the Afghan girls no one gave a shit about till we went hunting for Bin Where's Waldo?

There is no military solution to this conflict, and the US cannot fix Afghanistan. It can, however, but ought not, continue to spend, die and kill indefinitely.

To suggest the Pentagon and/or Karzai are even remotely interested in the plight of Afghan women is disingenuous.

There are countless ways to promote women's rights globally without drones, civilian deaths and 100,000 traumatized soldiers who will have immense PTSD problems. There are countless ways to make a better return on our feminist investment than fighting a losing battle against the Taliban.

Lyle
08-16-2010, 12:58 AM
After growing the Mujaheedin thugs that morphed into the Taliban government, the USA is suddenly (post 9/11) worried about the Afghan girls no one gave a shit about till we went hunting for Bin Where's Waldo?

This is an argument against helping Afghan women now, how? Did we train the Taliban to kill innocents by the way, or give them weaponry to shoot down Russian helicopters?

There is no military solution to this conflict, and the US cannot fix Afghanistan. It can, however, but ought not, continue to spend, die and kill indefinitely.

What's the solution to the Taliban killing people? Non-violent protest?

To suggest the Pentagon and/or Karzai are even remotely interested in the plight of Afghan women is disingenuous.

So what? Was fighting Nazi Germany about the Holocaust?

There are countless ways to promote women's rights globally without drones, civilian deaths and 100,000 traumatized soldiers who will have immense PTSD problems. There are countless ways to make a better return on our feminist investment than fighting a losing battle against the Taliban.

Countless ways? How did this kind of thing end in Afghanistan? Politics? Protest?

http://www.pco-bcp.gc.ca/docs/images/soccer.gif

Wonderment
08-16-2010, 01:38 AM
What's the solution to the Taliban killing people? Non-violent protest?

I don't have a solution to Taliban killing people. Do you think it's the USA's responsibility to ensure that no one commits murder on the planet? Do you think we need to militarily enforce democracy and women's rights all around the globe? Should we invade Saudi Arabia?

Lyle
08-16-2010, 01:44 AM
Do you think it's the USA's responsibility to ensure that no one commits murder on the planet? Do you think we need to militarily enforce democracy and women's rights all around the globe? Should we invade Saudi Arabia?

Well, we do arguably have such a responsibility in Afghanistan now... since it was we who got rid of the Taliban in the first place, and have remained there to ensure the new government doesn't become the Taliban of the old government. I mean, Saudi Arabia wasn't protecting Osama bin Laden (they wanted to kill him)... the Taliban in Afghanistan were. So thats where we went and thats where we are. Saudi Arabia's reckoning will just have to wait, because right now Uncle Sam is dealing with Afghanistan. He can only have his hands down so many pants at one time... you know?

The photo I posted wasn't a murder, by the way, it was a state execution. By not allowing the Taliban to rule, we can prevent state executions like that from happening.