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View Full Version : Climate Change, Earthquakes, Volcanoes and other Catastrophes


Ocean
04-16-2010, 07:26 PM
The magnificence of nature (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/16/world/europe/16ash.html?src=me&ref=general) humbles us again.

(And it also may ruin my vacation to look at the aurora...)

AemJeff
04-16-2010, 08:02 PM
The magnificence of nature (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/16/world/europe/16ash.html?src=me&ref=general) humbles us again.

(And it also may ruin my vacation to look at the aurora...)

I hope it doesn't. What a cool vacation! I spent six weeks in Anchorage on a job a long time ago - my biggest wish was to see it. Every night it was the same - nothing but clouds and stars. On the night I left (2am flight east) it finally flared up - I was in a window seat - but the plexiglass window was so scored and damaged, all I could see was a vague glow. :(

Ocean
04-16-2010, 08:14 PM
I hope it doesn't. What a cool vacation! I spent six weeks in Anchorage on a job a long time ago - my biggest wish was to see it. Every night it was the same - nothing but clouds and stars. On the night I left (2am flight east) it finally flared up - I was in a window seat - but the plexiglass window was so scored and damaged, all I could see was a vague glow. :(

My vacation is still in the wanting stage. Then the real planning via research will follow. I'll have to run a statistical analysis to determine what are the dates with highest frequency of aurora sightings and shoot for that. Or I'll have to move there for six months and keep my fingers crossed... I hear that the whole country is beautiful.

listener
04-16-2010, 08:49 PM
Yes, magnificent and humbling indeed (and more beautiful and far less lethal than the reminders of our smallness that nature seems to have been sending us lately).

I went to school in Montreal, and on rare winter nights one could see the aurora faintly shimmering in the distant sky -- nothing approaching the spectacular photographs I've seen, but pretty darn cool to witness in person.

Ocean
04-16-2010, 08:56 PM
Yes, magnificent and humbling indeed (and more beautiful and far less lethal than the reminders of our smallness that nature seems to have been sending us lately).

I went to school in Montreal, and on rare winter nights one could see the aurora faintly shimmering in the distant sky -- nothing approaching the spectacular photographs I've seen, but pretty darn cool to witness in person.

Lucky you that at least you have seen a bit of it! I've only seen photographs but I'd love to be able to see it in person. Volcano and all!

Florian
04-17-2010, 04:18 AM
There is a great essay by William James on the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, "On Some Mental Effects of the Earthquake"

http://grammar.about.com/od/classicessays/a/WJamesEarthquake.htm

Ocean
04-17-2010, 09:57 AM
There is a great essay by William James on the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, "On Some Mental Effects of the Earthquake"

http://grammar.about.com/od/classicessays/a/WJamesEarthquake.htm

Intersting essay, thanks. In this forum, quite some time ago, we had a discussion about how people feel when there is a major catastrophe. I told this story then, which I'll briefly repeat now. I was at the airport in Seattle, my airplane having arrived a few minutes before, when there was a 7.0 earthquake in the year 2001. I had never been in one, since I had lived all my life on the Atlantic coast of South and North America. The rattling of railings, shaking of moving objects, swaying of light posts and the rolling movement on the floor were as alien to my previous experience as you can imagine it. I had not a drop of fear. I was in awe. It was magnificent to watch and feel what was happening. I was immersed in the observation of the multiple aspects of the phenomenon without thinking about consequences or anything else, really. So, yes, nature has its multiple ways to show us our smallness. I loved it.

Ocean
04-17-2010, 11:38 AM
Intersting essay, thanks. In this forum, quite some time ago, we had a discussion about how people feel when there is a major catastrophe. I told this story then, which I'll briefly repeat now. I was at the airport in Seattle, my airplane having arrived a few minutes before, when there was a 7.0 earthquake in the year 2001. I had never been in one, since I had lived all my life on the Atlantic coast of South and North America. The rattling of railings, shaking of moving objects, swaying of light posts and the rolling movement on the floor were as alien to my previous experience as you can imagine it. I had not a drop of fear. I was in awe. It was magnificent to watch and feel what was happening. I was immersed in the observation of the multiple aspects of the phenomenon without thinking about consequences or anything else, really. So, yes, nature has its multiple ways to show us our smallness. I loved it.

And after writing this I went on to watch Science Saturday, just to hear John and George mention, in passing, exactly the same topic. One can no longer be original these days...

Unit
04-18-2010, 01:19 AM
The magnificence of nature (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/16/world/europe/16ash.html?src=me&ref=general) humbles us again.

(And it also may ruin my vacation to look at the aurora...)

So was Jindal right after all that monitoring volcanoes (http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/02/25/jindal.volcanoes/) is money badly spent?

listener
04-18-2010, 01:52 AM
Intersting essay, thanks. In this forum, quite some time ago, we had a discussion about how people feel when there is a major catastrophe. I told this story then, which I'll briefly repeat now. I was at the airport in Seattle, my airplane having arrived a few minutes before, when there was a 7.0 earthquake in the year 2001. I had never been in one, since I had lived all my life on the Atlantic coast of South and North America. The rattling of railings, shaking of moving objects, swaying of light posts and the rolling movement on the floor were as alien to my previous experience as you can imagine it. I had not a drop of fear. I was in awe. It was magnificent to watch and feel what was happening. I was immersed in the observation of the multiple aspects of the phenomenon without thinking about consequences or anything else, really. So, yes, nature has its multiple ways to show us our smallness. I loved it.

I've never heard anyone describe their experience of an earthquake in those terms -- i.e., "magnificent." What an amazingly vivid description of being present to witness the awesome power of the Earth, without a drop of fear. Do you think there is a connection or kinship between what you experienced then and your "waterfall" experience? It seems like they both involved deep, spontaneous immersion into the present moment.

JonIrenicus
04-18-2010, 04:51 AM
All I know, is any people who name anything


Eyjafjallajokull


need to be covered in lava.

out-of-control

Ocean
04-18-2010, 09:20 AM
All I know, is any people who name anything


Eyjafjallajokull


need to be covered in lava.

out-of-control

LOL!

Ocean
04-18-2010, 09:27 AM
So was Jindal right after all that monitoring volcanoes (http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/02/25/jindal.volcanoes/) is money badly spent?

If you lived near a volcano, you may think differently.

Of course if you think about super volcanoes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supervolcano), then why bother? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VR1bg_Yf0T4)

Don' worry, it will not happen any time soon.

Unit
04-18-2010, 10:59 AM
If you lived near a volcano, you may think differently.

Well yes, I would think "the federal govt is spending millions every year for me? I love the Federal govt! And plus I also get Federal home insurance if something really were to happen (no private insurance would cover me)? Woohoo! I really should keep this quiet."


Of course if you think about super volcanoes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supervolcano), then why bother? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VR1bg_Yf0T4)

Don' worry, it will not happen any time soon.

JonIrenicus
04-20-2010, 01:16 AM
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/04/photogalleries/100419-iceland-volcano-lightning-ash-pictures/#iceland-volcano-lightning-1_19113_600x450.jpg


All we get are earthquakes. That display is much more impressive.

Ocean
04-20-2010, 07:22 AM
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/04/photogalleries/100419-iceland-volcano-lightning-ash-pictures/#iceland-volcano-lightning-1_19113_600x450.jpg


All we get are earthquakes. That display is much more impressive.

I didn't know that there could be lightning added to it. Wow!