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View Full Version : First impressive e-reader I have seen


JonIrenicus
01-04-2010, 05:04 PM
http://www.engadget.com/2010/01/04/skiff-reader-is-largest-reader-yet-will-be-hitting-a-sprint-sto/


Not sure if such devices will make a difference to the print world, though I did hear that having an e-reader tends to increase the amount of reading done. But with such good resolution and a much larger screen, it seems ideal for newspaper layouts and magazines.


But will that make people want to.. pay for content again?

I think this kind of device could be useful to some people tied to universities, if you are enrolled you usually have access to a large number of scientific journals, maybe they could offer the entire catalog remotely on such a device for a small extra fee, like say 10 dollars a month?

Would be useful to the users, but then I guess they could always use laptops to access the information for free, but maybe they would prefer such a unified device for reading? It would definitely help pay for the access costs and shore up against dropping coverage for lower used journals.

As far as pay for content models, I think they may want to offer vastly more content for less money on such devices. The distribution costs for such content goes to virtually nil, and they may be able to entice more readers.

bjkeefe
01-04-2010, 05:43 PM
http://www.engadget.com/2010/01/04/skiff-reader-is-largest-reader-yet-will-be-hitting-a-sprint-sto/


Not sure if such devices will make a difference to the print world, though I did hear that having an e-reader tends to increase the amount of reading done. But with such good resolution and a much larger screen, it seems ideal for newspaper layouts and magazines.

Agreed.

But will that make people want to.. pay for content again?

I think so. Convenience is always worth something. Being able to get content wherever you can get a cell phone signal (as opposed to requiring WiFi access) has enormously helped the Kindle, I think.

Also, if the electronic version costs considerably less than the print version, that's another tipping point for some people.

One thing I'd like to see is a rental model. I probably would have bought a Kindle by now if Amazon let me, say, have access to new hardcover non-fiction for a couple of weeks for a couple of bucks, rather than asking ten or more bucks to "own" a copy.

I think this kind of device could be useful to some people tied to universities, if you are enrolled you usually have access to a large number of scientific journals, maybe they could offer the entire catalog remotely on such a device for a small extra fee, like say 10 dollars a month?

Yes. And there's also the possibility of e-textbooks, which could be very attractive to students. You'd want a good annotation feature on an e-reader to really make such a device attractive, but even without it, the savings alone should make it appeal.

In the end, I am still waiting for Steve Jobs to come to his senses and allow his design people to come up with an Apple e-book. Maybe ... (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/04/arts/04iht-design4.html)

JonIrenicus
01-04-2010, 05:50 PM
...

Yes. And there's also the possibility of e-textbooks, which could be very attractive to students. You'd want a good annotation feature on an e-reader to really make such a device attractive, but even without it, the savings alone should make it appeal.

In the end, I am still waiting for Steve Jobs to come to his senses and allow his design people to come up with an Apple e-book. Maybe ... (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/04/arts/04iht-design4.html)

I forgot about textbooks, the costs there are just stupid. This would be perfect for that.

Take away the argument for the "terrible costs" that must be put forward up front to print the books. Sorry guys, that vanishes, you still have fact checking and the like, so the costs are still there, but SOME reductions would be in order.

They should reduce it enough that it still leaves them with more profit accounting for the costs they bear for editors, but all the rest taken right out to give a bigger break for students on the cost side.

win win

TwinSwords
01-04-2010, 10:30 PM
One thing I'd like to see is a rental model. I probably would have bought a Kindle by now if Amazon let me, say, have access to new hardcover non-fiction for a couple of weeks for a couple of bucks, rather than asking ten or more bucks to "own" a copy.

Your local library (http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6649814.html) may lend them.

Caution, however: Libraries are a form of socialism!!!!1!

bjkeefe
01-04-2010, 10:47 PM
Your local library (http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6649814.html) may lend them.

Interesting. Thanks for the link.

I remember long ago when I first learned Blockbuster would rent VCRs and game consoles, and I couldn't believe they'd risk doing so, but evidently it worked. Hope they get the legal stuff squared away on this -- sounds like a great way for a small library to be able to offer its patrons the new, high-demand books.

Caution, however: Libraries are a form of socialism!!!!1!

Yes. And pretty soon, the only book you will be able to check out is The Sayings of Chairman Barack.

bjkeefe
01-07-2010, 06:06 PM
http://www.engadget.com/2010/01/04/skiff-reader-is-largest-reader-yet-will-be-hitting-a-sprint-sto/

Possible competition: "Plastic Logic Creates the ‘Paperless Briefcase’ (http://gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/01/07/plastic-logic-creates-the-paperless-briefcase/)."

[Added] Also, just for the sake of completeness: "Microsoft and H.P. Are Slate Mates (http://gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/01/07/microsoft-and-hp-are-slate-mates/)."