PDA

View Full Version : Women in Science


Ocean
11-22-2009, 11:26 AM
Yesterday while I was browsing through some of Steven Pinker's articles, I came across this video debate (http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/debate05/debate05_index.html). You'll have to scroll down the page a bit to find the video.

It was done in 2005 after the Harvard/Summers debacle. Some of you may have already watched it. I hadn't and I found it very interesting.

cragger
11-22-2009, 09:40 PM
Interesting talks by both speakers. And thank you for your concise and cogent reply on the language-vs.-thought point Pinker was trying to make in the thread for his recent diavlog with Bob Wright. I could plead a lack of attention during that diavlog, but it seems a rather cheezy excuse to someone who can crank out a point about the presence of prepositions between transitive verbs and indirect objects in the grammar of a second language.

This engenders no small hesitancy in commenting on the discussion you linked to. At around the age of nine, I was discovering that a chunk of the icy crust layer carefully removed from atop the playground snow would shatter in a very satisfying manner over the skull of a friend or random schoolmate. I could try to spin that into an example of scientific inquiry, relating the degree of satisfaction to the lack of anticipation by the inhabitant of the skull of their impending paticipation in the experiment, but I suspect that this would meet with the same disregard by someone who was reading Kant at that age as the whole affair did with my teachers and the school administration.

Pinker did claim boys engage in more rough and tumble play, but then again he also claims more of us are as dumb as a box of rocks. If the measure of an argument lies in its explanatory force ...

Ocean
11-22-2009, 10:17 PM
Interesting talks by both speakers. And thank you for your concise and cogent reply on the language-vs.-thought point Pinker was trying to make in the thread for his recent diavlog with Bob Wright. I could plead a lack of attention during that diavlog, but it seems a rather cheezy excuse to someone who can crank out a point about the presence of prepositions between transitive verbs and indirect objects in the grammar of a second language.

I couldn't figure out what Pinker meant when he was talking about the difference between the mentioned verbs in terms of Kantian categories. That's why I wrote the comment about transitive verbs. I ordered 'The Stuff of Thought' today. Hopefully I'll read it soon, and I'll be able to tell what that was all about.

This engenders no small hesitancy in commenting on the discussion you linked to. At around the age of nine, I was discovering that a chunk of the icy crust layer carefully removed from atop the playground snow would shatter in a very satisfying manner over the skull of a friend or random schoolmate. I could try to spin that into an example of scientific inquiry, relating the degree of satisfaction to the lack of anticipation by the inhabitant of the skull of their impending paticipation in the experiment, but I suspect that this would meet with the same disregard by someone who was reading Kant at that age as the whole affair did with my teachers and the school administration.

That's a funny story.

I grew up with a brother and male cousins around. While they were playing their boy games, I was bored. I always loved to read and my father had a pretty decent library. That's why at the age of nine I ended up trying to read "Critique of Pure Reason". I think it would be fairly accurate to say that I probably understood very little if anything.

Later on, and I figure I was about 14 or 15, I had to study Kant for Philosophy in High School. I read the book again. I think I understood some more.

However, I always think that Kant is the guy who wrote the story about the gigantic cockroach... :)

shaomiaoshelley
12-20-2009, 10:50 PM
I also saw it, I love it too!