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uncle ebeneezer
07-16-2009, 07:40 PM
So I grew up in New England where "turn the lights off", "shut the door", "draw the shades" etc. were the kinds of energy saving commandments that were drilled into our heads at a very young age. But I've noticed since I have been living in LA that a lot of people really don't take energy conservation seriously. I live in a house where people are always leaving the lights on all night. I play tennis with a guy who bribed his gardener to water his lawn more often than he's legally supposed to because "the grass was about to die." I was just curious if anyone else who is familiar with California has noticed this sortof thing?

bjkeefe
07-17-2009, 06:55 AM
So I grew up in New England where "turn the lights off", "shut the door", "draw the shades" etc. were the kinds of energy saving commandments that were drilled into our heads at a very young age. But I've noticed since I have been living in LA that a lot of people really don't take energy conservation seriously. I live in a house where people are always leaving the lights on all night. I play tennis with a guy who bribed his gardener to water his lawn more often than he's legally supposed to because "the grass was about to die." I was just curious if anyone else who is familiar with California has noticed this sortof thing?

Having been raised in the northeast and lived in LA for a decade, I'm not sure I agree. I think you may be comparing people of your parents' and grandparents' generation -- for whom memories of the Great Depression and the rationing of WWII were still in mind -- with a younger group (and maybe more wealthy and/or with fewer dependents) in LA, for one thing. It may also be that you're still instinctive about not wasting energy as you describe, and so tend to notice the exceptions -- people who do -- more readily. Or, maybe most of your early memories come from the heating season in the northeast, for which there isn't really a parallel in LA.

Whatever the case, my memories are that there were wasters and misers in both places. LA may have even had more people who were concerned about national- and global-scale waste than the northeast did, come to think of it.

kezboard
07-17-2009, 02:13 PM
Or maybe you're hanging out with more rich people, who don't care so much about their electricity and water bills, in LA than in New England. Did the people you grew up with play tennis and have gardeners?

uncle ebeneezer
07-17-2009, 06:23 PM
I think I am just noticing outliers where most people I know (relatively liberal green loving) are pretty good about it. But then again most of my close friends are from Minnesota, Boston, Ohio and other places with drastic heat/cold energy issues. The tennis guy is loaded (and a Republican who denies GW, so go figure), the other main waster is from PA and is poor, but he's a model who generally isn't very concerned about anything beyond getting laid.

I was just curious to see if anyone else had noticed regional differences.

I will say that 2 of the 3 Republicans that I consider friends, take the I-work-for-my-$-and-I-pay-for-this-water-and-this-is-America-goddamnit outlook towards natural resources.

claymisher
07-17-2009, 06:37 PM
I will say that 2 of the 3 Republicans that I consider friends, take the I-work-for-my-$-and-I-pay-for-this-water-and-this-is-America-goddamnit outlook towards natural resources.

You know, if they'd just make the price of water and electricity higher, it wouldn't be so bad.

As for me, I just hate waste in principle. Drives me crazy to see people watering the sidewalk.

uncle ebeneezer
07-17-2009, 10:21 PM
What drives me crazy is the amount of anger the GOP shows towards environmental activists. Fiscal conservation ($) is a virtue, yet conserving our natural resources (that $ was in a way invented to serve as a proxy for) is Fascism!!1!

I've met conservatives who honestly are more upset about the fiscal costs of the Iraq war than they are about the lives lost and yet they don't see the analogy between conserving our limited water supply and conserving our monetary treasure.