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View Full Version : Would you spare the Balrog?


JonIrenicus
04-03-2009, 03:32 AM
For those of you who are against the death penalty to ALL, take a look of this clip (while it remains up).


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nrqd7NhZ1gM&feature=PlayList&p=A7C5C70E319CEF7C&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=16


Now, assume it were possible to simply chain the creature in that low Hell for eternity, that or simply kill it. Which would you choose? You see, there are a select few murderers (most I would spare) that have as much value to me as a creature such as a balrog. Those types of... creatures, I would rather see wiped from existence, not simply chained. And you? is my comparison off? inhumane? Or do some actually agree with my take?

TwinSwords
04-03-2009, 04:35 AM
For those of you who are against the death penalty to ALL, take a look of this clip (while it remains up).


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nrqd7NhZ1gM&feature=PlayList&p=A7C5C70E319CEF7C&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=16


Now, assume it were possible to simply chain the creature in that low Hell for eternity, that or simply kill it. Which would you choose? You see, there are a select few murderers (most I would spare) that have as much value to me as a creature such as a balrog. Those types of... creatures, I would rather see wiped from existence, not simply chained. And you? is my comparison off? inhumane? Or do some actually agree with my take?

Awesome scene!!

In fact, it was this very scene that compelled me to get a 52" HDTV. The point when they emerge from the shaft and fall into the canyon (02:51-02:59 on the YouTube clip) was stunning in the theater, but so disappointing on my old 32" TV -- and on YouTube, it's nothing but a few pixels of light smeared across a black background.

I pity the poor souls who are watching this scene for the first time on YouTube.

pampl
04-03-2009, 11:17 AM
I don't even oppose the death penalty and I think it's a little silly to compare a real human being to a fictional physical embodiment of evil. Besides, in the context of the movie I'm not sure it's obvious that the Balrog is evil at all. He attacks enemy saboteurs and dies taking down one of their chief generals. Yes, he's in the army of an imperialist, but notice how anyone who obtains a fraction of Sauron's power comes to share his perspective- is it really such a crime to work for a guy who fell victim to the natural inclination of the powerful to use their power to create a global peace? Keep in mind that under a Pax Morgula all species would live together in relative harmony, ending the brutal ethnic cleansing campaigns the elves, dwarves and humans perpetrate against their 'degenerate' relatives.

AemJeff
04-03-2009, 11:32 AM
I don't even oppose the death penalty and I think it's a little silly to compare a real human being to a fictional physical embodiment of evil. Besides, in the context of the movie I'm not sure it's obvious that the Balrog is evil at all. He attacks enemy saboteurs and dies taking down one of their chief generals. Yes, he's in the army of an imperialist, but notice how anyone who obtains a fraction of Sauron's power comes to share his perspective- is it really such a crime to work for a guy who fell victim to the natural inclination of the powerful to use their power to create a global peace? Keep in mind that under a Pax Morgula all species would live together in relative harmony, ending the brutal ethnic cleansing campaigns the elves, dwarves and humans perpetrate against their 'degenerate' relatives.

Well the Balrog's backstory isn't a big secret (though you do have to do some searching.) It's actually one of the Maiar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maia_(Middle-earth)), the same order of being as Gandalf.

If you notice, even the Orcs are terrified of it - in a sense it's a closer analogy to view it as an elemental force; though, more accurately it's of an older, higher order of evil than the Orcs of Moria, an anachronistic holdover from Morgoth, of whom even Sauron was initially a servant. In the story context it seems to be entirely a malefactor, reacting to the general disturbance caused by the travelers of the Fellowship, and specifically to Gandalf who's both an old enemy and specifically challenging it at that moment; rather than behaving according to any ideas of sides or strategy.

[Sorry - you have invoked my inner Tolkien geek.]