PDA

View Full Version : Booknotes Is Now Fully Online!!!


nikkibong
01-08-2009, 08:40 PM
Calling all nerds! The entire 800-or-so episode canon of c-span's late, great, booknotes is now available online - and for free! (As recently as a few months ago, only half or so of the episodes were availble.)

As if bloggingheads doesn't eat up enough of your time already. . .(well, I'm back from a trip overseas, and school hasn't gotten in session again yet, so what the hell else am i supposed to do? hey, pay no attention to what my signature says!!)

Check out interviews with bhtv stalwarts such as Bob Wright, Glenn Loury, & John McWhorter. Special bonus: Mickey's interview when he still sported the unabomber beard! All conducted with the lovable "I'm an uninformed idiot" interview style of Brian Lamb.

Booknotes (booknotes.org).

TwinSwords
01-08-2009, 09:21 PM
Wow. Awesome. Thanks for the heads up.

TwinSwords
01-08-2009, 09:24 PM
Check out interviews with bhtv stalwarts such as Bob Wright, Glenn Loury, & John McWhorter. Special bonus: Mickey's interview when he still sported the unabomber beard!

Wow, I had no idea. This is going to be great.



All conducted with the lovable "I'm an uninformed idiot" interview style of Brian Lamb.

I'm afraid I have to disagree with that characterization. Lamb simply takes the apporach of starting with no assumptions about what the audience knows, and I think it's an effective and appropriate, if atypical, style. The famous example, of course, is the time he started an interview with a Lincoln biographer with the question, "Who was Abraham Lincoln?"

The queston doesn't indicate that Lamb is clueless. It's simply a logical starting point for a conversation about the life and times of the former president, and allows the biographer to start out with the broad sketch around which the details will be later filled in.

If you know what I mean.

nikkibong
01-08-2009, 10:26 PM
I'm afraid I have to disagree with that characterization. Lamb simply takes the apporach of starting with no assumptions about what the audience knows, and I think it's an effective and appropriate, if atypical, style. The famous example, of course, is the time he started an interview with a Lincoln biographer with the question, "Who was Abraham Lincoln?"

The queston doesn't indicate that Lamb is clueless. It's simply a logical starting point for a conversation about the life and times of the former president, and allows the biographer to start out with the broad sketch around which the details will be later filled in.

If you know what I mean.

indeed i do know what you mean, and agree: i was just kidding. i happen to think brian lamb is one of the best interviewers around. larry king actually is an idiot; brian lamb, however, takes a deliberate approach. (and he clearly actually reads the books that he interviews the authors about.)

uncle ebeneezer
01-09-2009, 01:12 AM
Thanks nikki (as if I needed more things to distract me!) Seriously though, great find!

I just watched Bob's interview. Man, talk about dry. Bob was actually even more of the "straight man" back then. But his formulations and the interview were excellent.

The questions are funny at times in how simple they are. i understand why Wally asks them, but they almost make you start (ex: did he really just ask what genes are?) But anyways, these look like some great interviews. I look forward to them. I didn't realize Bob & Mickey were co-editors at TNR (by the way, are we ever going to come with different abbreviations for The New Republic and The National Review?)

AemJeff
01-09-2009, 07:06 AM
Thanks nikki (as if I needed more things to distract me!) Seriously though, great find!

I just watched Bob's interview. Man, talk about dry. Bob was actually even more of the "straight man" back then. But his formulations and the interview were excellent.

The questions are funny at times in how simple they are. i understand why Wally asks them, but they almost make you start (ex: did he really just ask what genes are?) But anyways, these look like some great interviews. I look forward to them. I didn't realize Bob & Mickey were co-editors at TNR (by the way, are we ever going to come with different abbreviations for The New Republic and The National Review?)

TNR = The New Republic. NR/NRO = National Review/National Review Online. Why NR ceded the "T" is lost in the mists of history.

I second both the accolades and the complaint (like I need some other way to waste time, sheesh.) Nice find, nikkibong!

TwinSwords
01-11-2009, 08:47 PM
Thanks again, Nikkibong, for this find.

Yesterday I listened to Edward Said's 2001 appearance. Worth watching if you want to learn a little bit about the Israel/Palestine issue from the Palestinian perspective.

Reflections on Exile and Other Essays (http://www.booknotes.org/Program/?ProgramID=1618), by Edward Said

Stapler Malone
01-11-2009, 09:26 PM
TNR = The New Republic. NR/NRO = National Review/National Review Online. Why NR ceded the "T" is lost in the mists of history.


For the record, National Review has never officially used the definite article. Surely people will refer to it as "The National Review," but NR doesn't self-identify as such.

Jyminee
01-15-2009, 02:03 PM
I can't seem to get the site to work--tried in Firefox, Chrome, and IE. Clicking on the link for "Watch Program" just seems to reload the page. Any ideas?

nikkibong
01-15-2009, 02:13 PM
do you have a pop-up blocker activated? the booknotes player is a pop-up.

either that or brian lamb hates you!

bjkeefe
01-15-2009, 02:21 PM
I can't seem to get the site to work--tried in Firefox, Chrome, and IE. Clicking on the link for "Watch Program" just seems to reload the page. Any ideas?

I think it may be a problem with pop-up blocking, which is on by default, in Firefox at least.

For Firefox, do Tools -> Options. In the dialog box, click the Content icon in the toolbar running across the top. On the line where it says "Block pop-up windows" (where there's a box, probably checked), click the "Exceptions" button. In the new dialog box, add the following two entries to the list of "Allowed sites:"

booknotes.org
booknotes.virage.com

One at a time, type the address in the line labeled "Address of web site:" and click the "Allow" button. (You don't need to add "http://" or anything like that.) After you've entered both, click "Close" in that dialog box, click "OK" in the other one, and you should be good to go.

Note that you'll have to have the RealPlayer plugin installed to stream the video. If you don't have it, the pop-up window that you get after clicking on a "Watch video" link offers a link to download it.

Good luck.

AemJeff
01-15-2009, 02:25 PM
Do you have the RealPlayer plug-in installed?

Jyminee
01-15-2009, 10:17 PM
It was indeed pop-ups--oddly, Firefox usually alerts me when a pop-up is blocked, but it wasn't doing it for this site. Thanks all for the help!

BTW, I think Mickey looked better with the beard!

TwinSwords
01-18-2009, 05:02 PM
The episode featuring Christopher Hitchens (http://www.booknotes.org/Program/?ProgramID=1171) recorded in 1993, long before he acquired his current reputation is well worth watching.

I though his comments on Noam Chomsky were interesting:

Oh, by the way, that reminds me of someone I criminally left out when you asked who I thought was the great radical writer of the moment. I left out professor Noam Chomsky, who I think is one of the most extraordinary moral human beings of our time, and who has produced a shelf of books and critiques and findings and carefully calibrated work that holds up a mirror to American policy and society that it should look in more often. The reason I'm reminded of it is there's a wonderful story about Noam. He went to the dentist one days -- it's true -- and the dentist said "you're grinding your teeth." And he said, "No, I'm not, as far as I know." And the dentist said, "a lot of my patients say that; you're probably grinding them when you're asleep." And, his wife started monitoring him around the clock , and he wasn't doing it when he was asleep. And they monitored him more closely, and they found he was only grinding his teeth in the morning when he was reading the New York Times. (Laughs) And I think that is a great story about Chomsky, all of whose stuff anyone watching this should rush out and buy, and who's an example to us all. But also because I have the same experience reading the mainstream take on daily life, every day."

bjkeefe
01-18-2009, 06:12 PM
The episode featuring Christopher Hitchens (http://www.booknotes.org/Program/?ProgramID=1171) recorded in 1993, long before he acquired his current reputation is well worth watching.

Indeed it was. Thanks for the link.