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graz
06-03-2008, 10:06 PM
I am embarrassed for McCain. Poor guy is failing in his lame attempt to create the bumper-sticker worthy refrain. Deer in the headlights comes to mind. He should stick to making his case for himself. I'm not inclined to cut him slack, but I won't respect him in the morning if he continues to stumble and bumble along.

AemJeff
06-03-2008, 10:21 PM
I was watching, it wasn't much of a performance. Here's an interesting reaction (though not completely surprising):

McCain still talking and plodding along. Fox is the only one of the networks still carrying the speech. It’s pedestrian–and even McCain seems to have lost interest in his text. He read a line about Obama making a good first impression, and the audience inexplicably laughed. Did I miss something?

The source? Malkin (http://michellemalkin.com/2008/06/03/tonight-hillary-exits-obama-exults-mccain-exhorts/). Of course, she'll only grudgingly jump on the McCain bus as her opposition to Obama overcomes her hatred of undocumenteds, but this speech doesn't seem to be doing McCain much good.

Thus Spoke Elvis
06-04-2008, 12:14 PM
You shouldn't be surprised about the reaction to McCain's speech among right-wing bloggers. It is well-accepted that McCain is terrible at giving speeches. His strength as a campaigner is in town hall, Q & A settings.

I expect his speech at the RNC to be the worst since Bob Dole's in '96, and he'll get little, if any, bounce from it in the polls.

bjkeefe
06-04-2008, 01:45 PM
If I were McCain's speech coach, the first thing I would tell him is to stop saying "my friends." I don't know why that bugs me, but it does.

I'd also tell him to stop saying, "here's a little straight talk." I don't know if he said that in last night's speech, since I couldn't sit through the whole thing, but he does say it a lot. There gets to be a point where repeating your brand tagline has aversive effects.

look
06-04-2008, 05:42 PM
You shouldn't be surprised about the reaction to McCain's speech among right-wing bloggers. It is well-accepted that McCain is terrible at giving speeches. His strength as a campaigner is in town hall, Q & A settings.

I expect his speech at the RNC to be the worst since Bob Dole's in '96, and he'll get little, if any, bounce from it in the polls.TSE, a few weeks ago Conn Carroll said point-blank that he thought McCain will lose. What do you think?

Thus Spoke Elvis
06-05-2008, 11:08 AM
TSE, a few weeks ago Conn Carroll said point-blank that he thought McCain will lose. What do you think?

I definitely agree with Conn. I think most people on the right do. What makes it more depressing is that McCain was the best available candidate. We'll lose, but it will probably be a closer loss than it would have been with someone like Romney or Huckabee as the nominee. Both the Republican Party and conservative intellectualism have atrophied over the past several years. Hopefully the next few years in the wilderness will result in an intellectual renewal and an influx of new faces in the GOP.

bjkeefe
06-05-2008, 01:42 PM
Elvis:

What makes it more depressing is that McCain was the best available candidate.

Is there anyone that you could imagine, leading electability somewhat to the side, that you'd rather have seen as the GOP nominee? Or do you think it's just better from a long-term perspective to be forced to spend a few years "in the wilderness, to reformulate the ideas and platform?

Thus Spoke Elvis
06-05-2008, 02:12 PM
Elvis:

Is there anyone that you could imagine, leading electability somewhat to the side, that you'd rather have seen as the GOP nominee?

In terms of the national scene, not at the moment. In an ideal world, someone like Richard Lugar could be president, but that isn't going to happen. It's a shame that Mitt Romney was such a transparent phoney, because he would otherwise have been an excellent nominee.

Or do you think it's just better from a long-term perspective to be forced to spend a few years "in the wilderness, to reformulate the ideas and platform?

It might be good to spend a few years in the wilderness, but this is not the time I would prefer. The GOP may be out of power a lot longer if Obama is elected President than, say, Hillary (who I think would more likely be an ineffective one-term President). Also, I think it's possible for Republicans to begin rejuvenating even if McCain is elected president. A guy like Bobby Jindal, for example, would be ready to make a big national impact in a few more years.

bjkeefe
06-05-2008, 04:29 PM
Elvis:

A guy like Bobby Jindal, for example, would be ready to make a big national impact in a few more years.

From what little I've read about Jindal, he seems pretty far gone down the theocon road. Do you perceive him in the same way?

If so, do you think this will hamper him? It seems to me that lots of Reps/conservatives would like to move away from the religious right's goals.

If not, could you elaborate as to why you don't see him this way?

Thus Spoke Elvis
06-05-2008, 04:52 PM
I'm not a religious person, but I recognize and accept that most Americans are. I disagree with Jindal's religious views and some of his positions, but I'm much more comfortable with a guy of Jindal's pedigree-- a Rhodes Scholar and biology major with an impressive record of fiscal responsibility -- than I am with a religious conservative like Mike Huckabee. Jindal's not perfect, but he's a smart, fiscally-responsible conservative, and we need more of those at the national level.

look
06-05-2008, 05:25 PM
I definitely agree with Conn. I think most people on the right do. What makes it more depressing is that McCain was the best available candidate. We'll lose, but it will probably be a closer loss than it would have been with someone like Romney or Huckabee as the nominee. Both the Republican Party and conservative intellectualism have atrophied over the past several years. Hopefully the next few years in the wilderness will result in an intellectual renewal and an influx of new faces in the GOP.Wow, that's kind of surprising. I'm thinking that McCain's chances are looking up, what with the post-Super Tuesday exposure of Obama's far-leftist origins. I'm wondering if there's going to be a sort of anti-
'affirmative action' backlash. That is, it's easy for some to come to the conclusion that the press gave him a pass by not vetting him thoroughly, thereby giving him an unfair advantage. Thanks for your thoughts.

bjkeefe
06-05-2008, 05:35 PM
I'm not a religious person, but I recognize and accept that most Americans are. I disagree with Jindal's religious views and some of his positions, but I'm much more comfortable with a guy of Jindal's pedigree-- a Rhodes Scholar and biology major with an impressive record of fiscal responsibility -- than I am with a religious conservative like Mike Huckabee. Jindal's not perfect, but he's a smart, fiscally-responsible conservative, and we need more of those at the national level.

I do agree about his apparent smarts, and that part appeals to me, too.

But I am really troubled by his apparent disbelief in evolution and close ties with the IDiots, and what that symbolizes (suggests?). This is aggravated by your pointing out that he studied biology, in that I'd think if anyone should know better about this stuff, it's someone who is supposed to be smart and who was educated in the most relevant field. It makes me wonder what else he'd be inclined to dismiss in the face of overwhelming evidence, in preference for faith and gut instincts. It hardly needs saying, but I will anyway: the last eight years have shown the dangers of that kind of attitude.

AemJeff
06-05-2008, 10:41 PM
In an ideal world, someone like Richard Lugar could be president, but that isn't going to happen.

If Lugar were to run, I'd be tempted to vote for him - I'd definitely consider the possibility.