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Bloggingheads
03-30-2008, 10:52 PM

Simon Willard
03-31-2008, 01:00 AM
When Benjamin Franklin moved from Boston to Philadelphia, he records the atmosphere as being very different (and more to his liking) due to the lessor influence of Puritan mores and the greater tolerance for individuality. Today they are part of the same megaregion.

And what about Red Sox Nation? I went to a Royals / Red Sox game in Kansas City, and was stunned that half of the fans were dressed in Red!

I'm not sold on the "location matters" thesis. If the argument is that China used to be uniformly agrarian, and now it has urban regions, I understand that. But that's just the process of industrialization.

Hasn't economic activity been more heterogeneous in the past, at least in the United States? The textile industry used to be almost exclusively in Massachusetts, but today it could be anywhere. And haven't people always clustered to interact with others with the same interest? I'll have to ponder these theses, but at first blush they seem odd to me, and I feel Florida did not make his case.

Simon Willard
03-31-2008, 01:20 AM
Is Florida making a "states rights" argument here (http://bloggingheads.tv/diavlogs/9777?in=00:15:55)? I mean, how does state government differ from the Federal government? It's a matter of geographic locality.

otto
03-31-2008, 05:50 AM
Clean shaven? Loosened tie? Ernest look? Check, check, check.

deebee
03-31-2008, 09:27 AM
Unique subject with dynamic speakers. Some random thoughts:
As someone who has lived in all of the Personality Map geographical areas on Mr. Florida's site (Extroverted, Agreeable, Neurotic, Conscientious and Open to Experience) I pretty much agree with his assessment. Just wondering though what all of those who live in the white spaces are like -- totally nondescript? Have also personally found that different places are more compatible with different life stages as illustrated on Whatsyourcity.com.

Beyond the more general assessments of the flocking phenomenon, I've always wondered how some unique groups with specific interests, such as the Transcendendalists of Concord, MA for example, happened to find each other since that type of thought was quite unusual at the time.

Moving away from family has become less disruptive with the advent of e-mail, texting, more affordable phone service and travel options.

bjkeefe
03-31-2008, 09:44 AM
deebee:

Moving away from family has become less disruptive with the advent of e-mail, texting, more affordable phone service and travel options.

I quite agree. I found it desirable to put a little space in between my parents and me as soon as I was able, but the difference between living 150 miles away and 3000 miles away was almost negligible while they were in good health.

Email was about the best thing for family relationships ever invented for someone like me, raised by a writer mother who wanted nothing more than frequent letters from her kids. And yes to cheaper phone service, too, although my father occasionally still slips into, "boy, this call must be costing you a fortune." (This, doubtless, is also due in part to his hidden agenda to convert me to his new love of Skype.)

At the same time, however, there is no substitute, at least in my mind, for living in a place where you feel stimulated by people you bump into day to day. For all the goodness of telecommuting, I still like the proverbial water cooler. For all the goodness of the Web, I still like the local coffee house.

bjkeefe
03-31-2008, 10:00 AM
As an argument for the best president for the future of America, how delightful was this (http://bloggingheads.tv/diavlogs/9777?in=49:09&out=49:42)?

Struttin' now, baby!

osmium
03-31-2008, 12:46 PM
will gently helps me understand why i live in new york. (http://www.bloggingheads.tv/diavlogs/9777?in=00:43:15&out=00:43:26)

piscivorous
03-31-2008, 12:54 PM
Yea it seems that in each of his recent Diavlogs Mr. Wilkinson seems to reveal his prejudices and prejudgments of what kind of people live where. Perhaps he should get out more often into the real world.

Simon Willard
03-31-2008, 01:04 PM
I've always wondered how some unique groups with specific interests, such as the Transcendendalists of Concord, MA for example, happened to find each other

You put your finger on it when you said "of Concord, MA". They were already close geographically, so it wan't hard for them to find each other. What is advertised as a "movement" in the history books was actually a small and motley crew of local intellectuals and misfits. Some of the famous trancendentalists, Louisa and Anna Alcott were just 10 and 12 years old when they joined the commune with their parents. The point is that sometimes places make people, rather than the people making the places.

Simon Willard
03-31-2008, 01:07 PM
The book title "Who's Your City" reminds me of something I was told in Indiana: that the "Hoosier State" comes from the phrase "Who's your state?", in other words, "Where are you from?"

osmium
03-31-2008, 01:11 PM
with me he's right, but i might be bad data.

i kinda like the sound of that. :)

DWAnderson
03-31-2008, 03:33 PM
I thought it was striking that for all the talk of how important it was to live in one of the urban centers of creativity because of the opportunity to be in daily contact with other creative people, much of Rich's discussion of how the ideas in the book took shape involved people at many other geographically far flung institutions and how helpful he found their ideas and insights. Indeed all the participants in this diavlog were geographically dispersed (the two speakers and all of the watchers and commenters).

This makes me think that while the world may be "spiky" now, it is getting flatter and flatter at a rate that is accelerating thanks to the advancement and growing prevalence of communications technology.

I wonder if 10 years from now if the spikyness Florida has observed will be seen as anachronistic.

berger
03-31-2008, 03:57 PM
Maybe Will can interview those desk-psychologists next! Or perhaps someone who can interpret personalities on the basis of eyeglass frames! Ahh the creative class at work.

uncle ebeneezer
03-31-2008, 04:18 PM
What is the first thing you should say when moving to a new place?:

http://www.bloggingheads.tv/diavlogs/9777?in=00:04:25&out=00:04:28

daveh
04-01-2008, 02:46 AM
One of the questions that I have about Mr. Florida's work is -- what do you think he would have been saying in 1977? Do you think he would have said it would be a good idea to move to Manhattan? Would he have been saying Atlanta is about to become a major cosmopolitan metropolis when Lester Maddox was handing out the axe handles?

As to the personality types common to each city, I remember once reading about the Myers-Brigges personality test, and that Washington, DC is actually the most introverted place -- which surprised me -- due to the heavy concentration of military people who outnumber the political types. That was a few years back, maybe that no longer holds.

jstrummer
04-01-2008, 03:25 PM
Richard Florida is like that other huckster Malcolm Gladwell. He writes just the kind of book that is full of counter-intuitive "insights" that can never actually be verified. But, importantly, the book flatters the very people who are likely to go to Amazon.com to buy it by telling what they want to hear: that they are so very important as members of this vaunted creative class.

Also, Florida himself is no schlub, which doesn't hurt his sales or attendance at his speaking engagements I'm sure.

Running Dog
04-02-2008, 08:51 AM
Mr Florida is a world class name dropper. Makes his ideas more important?

privatepress
04-02-2008, 02:17 PM
Will Wilkinson is a charter member of the Iowa brain drain.

Me&theboys
05-06-2008, 05:39 PM
Interesting stuff...kind of...some of this conversation seemed like old news in new clothes....hard to tell whether or not the book offers new insights. I almost only read Kindle versions of books now. You're a Kindle user, Will. See if you can get Florida to get his book into Kindle format.

look
05-07-2008, 03:05 PM
Interesting stuff...kind of...some of this conversation seemed like old news in new clothes....hard to tell whether or not the book offers new insights. I almost only read Kindle versions of books now. You're a Kindle user, Will. See if you can get Florida to get his book into Kindle format.Hi, Me&. I enjoy the feel of a real book, so don't have a particular need to read books on a Kindle. But I detest reading articles while sitting at the computer, so how easy is it to transfer online articles onto a Kindle?

Me&theboys
05-11-2008, 05:57 PM
Hi Look. I too am a total lover of physical books -I like to smell them and carry them around and turn their pages and ejoy seeing them on the bookshelf. But the Kindle is VERY appealing, especially once you start to use it. Something about it just makes you want to read books on it. For a while, I thought (worried) I might never read a regular book again. But I have such a backlog of books I own that are on my "to read" list that I still do plenty of real book reading. most of my latest book buying has been on the Kindle, though. I just LOVE having 100+ books at my fingertips, so I can read whatever strikes my fancy, or just download something else instantaneously. I used to travel with loads of books - now I just travel wth the Kindle.

As for transferring articles to the Kindle, it is very simple. I downloaded the free Mobipocket reader and use that to convert all the documents I want to upload, then I just send them to my kindle email address. Amazon then puts them on my Kindle. If you read a lot of journal articles or long word documents, the Kindle is great. It is MUCH different from and better than reading on a computer.

Happy reading!

themightypuck
05-11-2008, 09:44 PM
I made a joke to a friend ten years ago when I moved from SF to LA: once I'm gone, I'll never be able to afford to move back. How true and how sad my mocking prediction has become. SF is my city. LA will have to do for now.

(edit: not that LA sucks. I'm sure it beats most places.)

bjkeefe
05-12-2008, 12:52 AM
Me&, look:

In case you didn't see it: http://www.cjr.org/cover_story/the_future_of_reading.php

Also: bonus video: http://www.cjr.org/feature/video_the_future_of_reading.php

I thought both were pretty good -- Klein is more musing on what the future holds than doing a straight review, with the Kindle considered very clearly as v1.0 (not as a jab; EK salutes it).

look
05-17-2008, 03:12 PM
Hi Look. I too am a total lover of physical books -I like to smell them and carry them around and turn their pages and ejoy seeing them on the bookshelf. But the Kindle is VERY appealing, especially once you start to use it. Something about it just makes you want to read books on it. For a while, I thought (worried) I might never read a regular book again. But I have such a backlog of books I own that are on my "to read" list that I still do plenty of real book reading. most of my latest book buying has been on the Kindle, though. I just LOVE having 100+ books at my fingertips, so I can read whatever strikes my fancy, or just download something else instantaneously. I used to travel with loads of books - now I just travel wth the Kindle.

As for transferring articles to the Kindle, it is very simple. I downloaded the free Mobipocket reader and use that to convert all the documents I want to upload, then I just send them to my kindle email address. Amazon then puts them on my Kindle. If you read a lot of journal articles or long word documents, the Kindle is great. It is MUCH different from and better than reading on a computer.

Happy reading!
Ah, the scent of a book...burying my nose in a book and smelling that wonderful library scent takes me back to blissful summer days and reading till dawn. It's permanently wrecked my sleep pattern!

Thanks for the info. I had a dread of having to hook up a usb cord, etc.

look
05-17-2008, 03:18 PM
Me&, look:

In case you didn't see it: http://www.cjr.org/cover_story/the_f...of_reading.php

Also: bonus video: http://www.cjr.org/feature/video_the...of_reading.php

I thought both were pretty good -- Klein is more musing on what the future holds than doing a straight review, with the Kindle considered very clearly as v1.0 (not as a jab; EK salutes it).

Thanks for the links, very interesting. This was especially thought provoking:

Hyperlinking provides a useful example of how this can work. There is nothing simpler or more fundamental to online writing than coding text so that clicking on it directs the reader elsewhere.

Ezra mentions that the Kindle has a 'lousy browser.' Does this mean you can follow links from the text? And if you can, I guess it would impossible to navigate around the page...it would be wysiwyg?

bjkeefe
05-17-2008, 04:07 PM
Ezra mentions that the Kindle has a 'lousy browser.' Does this mean you can follow links from the text? And if you can, I guess it would impossible to navigate around the page...it would be wysiwyg?

As I understood it from his review, the current version doesn't support links. He was talking about his imagined next version. Maybe ask Bloggin, though -- he'd know.